Reference : Morphological, structural and functional properties of starch granules extracted from...
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Food science
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/224938
Morphological, structural and functional properties of starch granules extracted from the tubers and seeds of Sphenostylis stenocarpa
English
Malumba Kamba, Paul mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Agronomie, Bio-ingénierie et Chimie (AgroBioChem) > Microbial, food and biobased technologies >]
Doran, Lynn mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Agronomie, Bio-ingénierie et Chimie (AgroBioChem) > Microbial, food and biobased technologies >]
Zanmenou, W. [> >]
Odjo, S. [> >]
Katanga, J. [> >]
Blecker, Christophe mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Agronomie, Bio-ingénierie et Chimie (AgroBioChem) > Microbial, food and biobased technologies >]
Bera, François mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Agronomie, Bio-ingénierie et Chimie (AgroBioChem) > Microbial, food and biobased technologies >]
6-Sep-2017
Carbohydrate Polymers
Elsevier Science
178
286-294
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0144-8617
[en] Sphenostylis, Seed, Tuber ; Starch, Granules, Property
[en] Sphenostylis stenocarpa (Hochst. ex A. Rich.) Harms, is a legume widely recognized in Africa for its edible starchy tuber and seeds. In the present morphological, structural and functional properties of starch extracted from the tubers and seeds of a same accession of this plant were characterized and compared. With smaller and more angular granules, tuber starch displayed higher resistance toward amylolysis and gelatinization than seed starch. The amylolysis of seed starch resulted in fragmented granules with typical layered structures of growth rings. During their hydrothermal treatments, both tuber and seed starches showed condensed ghosts even at 95 °C. This high resistance toward hydrothermal degradation was considered as the basis of the typical pasting properties of these two materials. Both seed and tuber starch exhibited A-type crystalline pattern. Under non-oxidative combustion tuber starch presented a degradation peak at 310 °C while seed starch was degraded around 302 °C.
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/224938

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