Reference : Late Holocene changes on erosion pattern on a lacustrine environment: landscape stabi...
Scientific journals : Article
Physical, chemical, mathematical & earth Sciences : Earth sciences & physical geography
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/226132
Late Holocene changes on erosion pattern on a lacustrine environment: landscape stabilization by volcanic activity versus human activity
English
Lamair, Laura mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > > SPHERES >]
Hubert, Aurelia mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de géographie > Géomorphologie et Géologie du Quaternaire >]
El Ouahabi, Meriam mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de géographie > Géomorphologie et Géologie du Quaternaire >]
Yamamoto, Shinya [> >]
Schmidt, Sabine [> >]
Vander Auwera, Jacqueline mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de géologie > Pétrologie, géochimie endogènes et pétrophysique >]
Lepoint, Gilles mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Biologie, Ecologie et Evolution > Océanographie biologique >]
Boes, Evelien [> >]
Fujiwara, Osamu [> >]
Yokoyama, Yususke [> >]
De Batist, Marc [> >]
Heyvaert, Vanessa [> >]
2018
Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems (G3)
Wiley-Blackwell
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
1525-2027
WA
[en] The most recent eruption of Mt. Fuji (Japan), the VEI 5 Hōei plinian eruption (CE 1707) heavily impacted Lake Yamanaka, a shallow lake located at the foot of Mt. Fuji. Here, we discuss the influence of the Hōei eruption on the lacustrine sedimentation of Lake Yamanaka using high resolution geophysical and geochemical measurements on gravity cores. Hōei scoria fall-out had two major impacts on Lake Yamanaka: (i) reduction of the sedimentation rate (from ~0.16 cm/yr to ~0.09 cm/yr); and (ii) the increase of in-situ lake productivity. Sedimentation rates after the eruption were relatively low due to the thick scoria layer, trapping underlying sediments in the catchment. The lacustrine system took over more than ~170 years to begin to recover from the Hōei eruption: sedimentation recovery have been accelerated by changes in land use. Since the beginning of the 20th Century, vegetated strips delimited cultivated parcels, trapping sediment and minimizing the anthropogenic impacts on the sedimentation rate. Over the last decade, the decline of agriculture and the increase of other human activities led to an increase in the sedimentation rate (~1 cm/yr). This study highlights the effect of the grainsize of the volcanic ejecta on the sedimentation rate following a volcanic eruption. Coarse-grained tephra are difficult to erode. Therefore, their erosion and remobilization is largely limited to intense typhoons when porous scoria deposits are saturated by heavy rains. Moreover, this study suggests that recent anthropogenic modifications of the catchment had a greater impact on the sedimentation rate than the Hōei eruption.
Belspo BRAIN
QuakeRecNankai
Researchers
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/226132
10.1029/2018GC008067

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