Reference : Intestinal Sucrase as a Novel Target Contributing to the Regulation of Glycemia by Pr...
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Veterinary medicine & animal health
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/201721
Intestinal Sucrase as a Novel Target Contributing to the Regulation of Glycemia by Prebiotics.
English
Neyrinck, Audrey M. [> >]
Pachikian, Barbara [> >]
Taminiau, Bernard mailto [Université de Liège > Département de sciences des denrées alimentaires (DDA) > Microbiologie des denrées alimentaires >]
Daube, Georges mailto [Université de Liège > Département de sciences des denrées alimentaires (DDA) > Microbiologie des denrées alimentaires >]
Frederick, Raphael [> >]
Cani, Patrice D. [> >]
Bindels, Laure B. [> >]
Delzenne, Nathalie M. [> >]
2016
PLoS ONE
11
8
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
1932-6203
United States
[en] Inulin-type fructans (ITF) are known for their capacity to modulate gut microbiota, energy metabolism and to improve glycemia in several animal models of obesity, and in humans. The potential contribution of ITF as modulators of sugar digestion by host enzymes has not been evaluated yet. A sucrose challenge has been performed on naive mice fed a standard diet supplemented with or without native chicory inulin (Fibruline 5%) for 3 weeks. The area under the curve of glycemia as well as sucrase activity in the small intestine were lowered after inulin treatment. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene confirmed important changes in gut microbiota (mostly in favor of Blautia genus) due to inulin extract supplementation. Interestingly, the suppressive effect of inulin extract on postprandial glycemia also occurred when inulin was directly added to the sucrose solution, suggesting that the effect on sucrose digestion did not require chronic inulin administration. In vitro tests confirmed a direct inhibition of sucrase enzyme by the inulin extract, thereby suggesting that native chicory inulin, in addition to its well-known prebiotic effect, is also able to decrease the digestibility of carbohydrates, a phenomenon that can contribute in the control of post prandial glycemia. We may not exclude that the sucrose escaping the digestion could also contribute to the changes in the gut microbiota after a chronic treatment with inulin.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/201721
10.1371/journal.pone.0160488

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