Article (Scientific journals)
COVCOG: Immediate and long-term cognitive improvement after cognitive versus emotion management psychoeducation programs - a randomized trial in covid patients with neuropsychological difficulties.
Willems, Sylvie; Didone, Vincent; Cabello Fernandez, Carmen et al.
2023In BMC Neurology, 23 (1), p. 307
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Keywords :
Cognitive behavior counseling; Cognitive impairment; Cognitive rehabilitation; Counseling; Long COVID; Post-acute COVID; Psychoeducation; Humans; Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome; Quality of Life; Cognition; Emotions; COVID-19; Neurology (clinical); General Medicine
Abstract :
[en] [en] BACKGROUND: Cognitive difficulties are a frequent complaint in long COVID and persist for more than a year post- infection. There is a lack of evidence-based data on effective intervention strategies. Non-pharmacological intervention programs that are used with other neurological populations have not yet been the subject of controlled trials. COVCOG is a multicentric, randomized trial comparing cognitive intervention and a cognitive-behavioural counselling. METHODS/DESIGN: Patients with long covid are selected and recruited at least three months post-infection. Patients are randomised in a 1:1 ratio into the cognitive (neuropsychological psychoeducation) and affective (emotion management with cognitive-behavioural counselling) intervention arms. The inclusion of 130 patients is planned. The cognitive intervention includes psycho-educational modules on fatigue and sleep, attention and working memory, executive functions and long-term memory. The affective intervention includes modules on emotion recognition and communication, uncertainty management and behavioral activation. The main objective is to reduce cognitive complaints 2 months after the intervention. A Follow-up is also planned at 8 months. DISCUSSION: Given the long-term effects of Covid on cognition and the negative effects of cognitive impairment on quality of life and social participation, it is important to determine whether low-dose, non-pharmacological interventions can be effective. The trial will determine which of the usual types of intervention is the most effective. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov Number: NCT05167266 (21/12/ 2021).
Disciplines :
Neurosciences & behavior
Author, co-author :
Willems, Sylvie  ;  Université de Liège - ULiège > Psychologie et Neuroscience Cognitives (PsyNCog)
Didone, Vincent ;  Université de Liège - ULiège > Psychologie et Neuroscience Cognitives (PsyNCog)
Cabello Fernandez, Carmen ;  Université de Liège - ULiège > Psychologie et Neuroscience Cognitives (PsyNCog)
Delrue, Gaël ;  Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Service de médecine de l'appareil locomoteur
Slama, Hichem;  Clinical Neuropsychological Unit, Brussel University Hospital, Erasme, Brussels, Belgium
Fery, Patrick;  Clinical Neuropsychological Unit, Brussel University Hospital, Erasme, Brussels, Belgium
Goin, Julien ;  Clinique psychologique et logopédique universitaire (CPLU)
Della Libera, Clara ;  Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Psychologie
COVCOG Group
Collette, Fabienne  ;  Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Psychologie
Other collaborator :
Rousseau, Anne-Françoise  ;  Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Service des soins intensifs
Language :
English
Title :
COVCOG: Immediate and long-term cognitive improvement after cognitive versus emotion management psychoeducation programs - a randomized trial in covid patients with neuropsychological difficulties.
Publication date :
18 August 2023
Journal title :
BMC Neurology
eISSN :
1471-2377
Publisher :
Springer Science and Business Media LLC, England
Volume :
23
Issue :
1
Pages :
307
Peer reviewed :
Peer Reviewed verified by ORBi
Available on ORBi :
since 22 September 2023

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