Unpublished conference/Abstract (Scientific congresses and symposiums)
High-resolution description of insular and fjordic benthic food webs in Antarctica
Dogniez, Martin; Schön, Isabelle; Lepoint, Gilles et al.
2023Workshop on Species Interactions in the Southern Ocean,
 

Files


Full Text
Martin Dogniez - High resolution description of SO benthic communities.pdf
Author postprint (3.73 MB)
Download

All documents in ORBi are protected by a user license.

Send to



Details



Keywords :
Antarctic Peninsula; Food webs; Benthic communities; Southern Ocean; Sustainable sciences; Climate change; Global change; TANGO expedition
Abstract :
[en] When it comes to global change, the poles are among the most impacted regions on our planet. Since the last world war, the Antarctic continent in particular experienced warming rates four times higher than the rest of the planet. This modification of the Antarctic climate has huge implications for the remote ecosystems that this continent harbours, where organisms have evolved to cope with the harsh local environmental conditions. Indeed, changes in abiotic parameters all around Antarctica are already causing some noticeable change in ecosystems dynamics, both on land and at sea. These perturbations will likely cause fundamental changes in some core characteristics of Antarctic ecosystems, one of them being the feeding interactions between marine organisms. Yet, information is lacking on how the different environmental factors shape Antarctic food-webs, especially in shallow-water benthic communities. With the EVOSOUTH project, we aim to depict quantitatively the variability of shallow-water benthic food-webs along the Antarctic Peninsula, with a focus on two different representative habitats: the sedimentary soft-bottoms and the shallow macroalgae forests. There, we will take advantage of the gradient of environmental conditions that exists along the Peninsula to explore how they shape the properties of food-webs, and gain some insight on their possible evolution under scenarios of future change in the region. This work will contribute to the TANGO project, a collaboration between the Universities of Liège, Ghent, and Brussels as well as the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences. Through four work packages going from the individual response of organisms to environmental changes all the way up to a mechanistic modelling of the benthic ecosystems of the peninsula, this project aims to predict tipping points leading to regime shifts in Antarctic benthic ecosystems.
Disciplines :
Aquatic sciences & oceanology
Author, co-author :
Dogniez, Martin  ;  Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Biologie, Ecologie et Evolution > Laboratoire d'Ecologie trophique et isotopique ; Université de Liège - ULiège > Freshwater and OCeanic science Unit of reSearch (FOCUS) ; IRSNB - Institut Royal des Sciences Naturelles de Belgique [BE] > OD Nature > Freshwater Biology
Schön, Isabelle;  IRSNB - Institut Royal des Sciences Naturelles de Belgique [BE] > OD Nature > Freshwater Biology
Other collaborator :
Lepoint, Gilles  ;  Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Biologie, Ecologie et Evolution ; Université de Liège - ULiège > Freshwater and OCeanic science Unit of reSearch (FOCUS) ; Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Biologie, Ecologie et Evolution > Laboratoire d'Ecologie trophique et isotopique
Michel, Loïc  ;  Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Biologie, Ecologie et Evolution > Systématique et diversité animale ; Université de Liège - ULiège > Freshwater and OCeanic science Unit of reSearch (FOCUS)
Language :
English
Title :
High-resolution description of insular and fjordic benthic food webs in Antarctica
Publication date :
30 May 2023
Event name :
Workshop on Species Interactions in the Southern Ocean,
Event organizer :
UGent
Event place :
Gand, Belgium
Event date :
Du 30 Mai 2023 au 31 Mai 2023
Available on ORBi :
since 23 July 2023

Statistics


Number of views
26 (5 by ULiège)
Number of downloads
38 (2 by ULiège)

Bibliography


Similar publications



Contact ORBi