Article (Scientific journals)
Exposure to the pesticides linuron, dimethomorph and imazalil alters steroid hormone profiles and gene expression in developing rat ovaries.
Boberg, Julie; Johansson, Hanna K L; Franssen, Delphine et al.
2023In Toxicology Letters, 373, p. 114-122
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Keywords :
01XP1SU59O (Linuron); Pesticides; 6K0NOF3XQ6 (enilconazole); 3EXL2158GV (dimethomorph); Androgen Antagonists; Hormones; Steroids; Female; Animals; Rats; Linuron/toxicity; Pesticides/toxicity; Ovary; Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System; Pituitary-Adrenal System; Androgen Antagonists/toxicity; Gene Expression; Anti-androgens; Endocrine disrupting chemicals; fetal; gonadotropins; pesticides; reproduction
Abstract :
[en] Inhibition of androgen signaling during critical stages of ovary development can disrupt folliculogenesis with potential consequences for reproductive function later in life. Many environmental chemicals can inhibit the androgen signaling pathway, which raises the question if developmental exposure to anti-androgenic chemicals can negatively impact female fertility. Here, we report on altered reproductive hormone profiles in prepubertal female rats following developmental exposure to three pesticides with anti-androgenic potential: linuron (25 and 50 mg/kg bw/d), dimethomorph (60 and 180 mg/kg bw/d) and imazalil (8 and 24 mg/kg bw/d). Dams were orally exposed from gestational day 7 (dimethomorph and imazalil) or 13 (linuron) until birth, then until end of dosing at early postnatal life. Linuron and dimethomorph induced dose-related reductions to plasma corticosterone levels, whereas imazalil mainly suppressed gonadotropin levels. In the ovaries, expression levels of target genes were affected by linuron and dimethomorph, suggesting impaired follicle growth. Based on our results, we propose that anti-androgenic chemicals can negatively impact female reproductive development. This highlights a need to integrate data from all levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, as well as the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, when investigating the potential impact of endocrine disruptors on female reproductive development and function.
Disciplines :
Endocrinology, metabolism & nutrition
Laboratory medicine & medical technology
Pediatrics
Author, co-author :
Boberg, Julie;  Research Group for Molecular & Reproductive Toxicology, National Food Institute,
Johansson, Hanna K L;  Research Group for Molecular & Reproductive Toxicology, National Food Institute,
Franssen, Delphine ;  Université de Liège - ULiège > Département des sciences cliniques > Pédiatrie
Draskau, Monica Kam;  Research Group for Molecular & Reproductive Toxicology, National Food Institute,
Christiansen, Sofie;  Research Group for Molecular & Reproductive Toxicology, National Food Institute,
Cramer, Johannah;  Research Group for Molecular & Reproductive Toxicology, National Food Institute,
Pedersen, Mikael;  Research Group for Analytical Food Chemistry, National Food Institute, Technical
Parent, Anne-Simone ;  Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Service de pédiatrie
Svingen, Terje;  Research Group for Molecular & Reproductive Toxicology, National Food Institute,
Language :
English
Title :
Exposure to the pesticides linuron, dimethomorph and imazalil alters steroid hormone profiles and gene expression in developing rat ovaries.
Publication date :
15 January 2023
Journal title :
Toxicology Letters
ISSN :
0378-4274
eISSN :
1879-3169
Publisher :
Elsevier, Nl
Volume :
373
Pages :
114-122
Peer reviewed :
Peer Reviewed verified by ORBi
Commentary :
Copyright © 2022 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Available on ORBi :
since 17 January 2023

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