Reference : The role of predation risk in metamorphosis versus behavioural avoidance: a sex-speci...
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Animal psychology, ethology & psychobiology
Life sciences : Aquatic sciences & oceanology
Life sciences : Environmental sciences & ecology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/233472
The role of predation risk in metamorphosis versus behavioural avoidance: a sex-specific study in a facultative paedomorphic amphibian
English
Denoël, Mathieu mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Biologie, Ecologie et Evolution > Laboratoire d'Écologie et de Conservation des Amphibiens >]
Drapeau, Laura [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Biologie, Ecologie et Evolution > Unité de Biologie du Comportement - Laboratoire d'Ethologie des Poissons et Amphibiens > > >]
Oromi Farrús, Neus [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Biologie, Ecologie et Evolution > Laboratoire d'Écologie et de Conservation des Amphibiens >]
Winandy, Laurane mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Biologie, Ecologie et Evolution > Laboratoire d'Écologie et de Conservation des Amphibiens >]
Mar-2019
Oecologia
Springer
189
3
637-645
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0029-8549
1432-1939
Germany
[en] behavioural avoidance ; facultative paedomorphosis ; invasives pecies ; metamorphosis ; polyphenism ; heterochrony ; Larzac ; Lissotriton helveticus ; palmate newt ; amphibian ; goldfish ; Carassus auratus ; shelter use ; behavioral ecology ; biased sex-ratio ; sexual differences ; predation risk ; experiment ; anti-predator response ; Larzac ; progenesis
[en] Evolutionary theory predicts the evolution of metamorphosis over paedomorphosis (the retention of larval traits at the adult stage) in response to life in unfavourable habitats and to the benefits of dispersal. Although many organisms are canalised into obligatory complex or simple life cycles, some species of newts and salamanders can express both processes (facultative paedomorphosis). Previous research highlighted the detrimental effect of fish on both metamorphic and paedomorphic phenotypes, but it remains unknown whether predation risk could induce shifts from paedomorphosis to metamorphosis, whether behavioural avoidance could be an alternative strategy to metamorphosis and whether these responses could be sex-biased. Testing these hypotheses is important because metamorphosed paedomorphs are dispersal individuals which could favour the long-term persistence of the process by breeding subsequently in more favourable waters. Therefore, we quantified the spatial behaviour and timing of the metamorphosis of facultative paedomorphic palmate newts Lissotriton helveticus in response to predation risk. We found that fish induced both male and female paedomorphs to hide more often, but behavioural avoidance was not predictive of metamorphosis. Paedomorphs did not metamorphose more in the presence of fish, yet there was an interaction between sex and predation risk in metamorphosis timing. These results improve our understanding of the lower prevalence of paedomorphs in fish environments and of the female-biased sex-ratios in natural populations of paedomorphic newts. Integrating sex-dependent payoffs of polyphenisms and dispersal across habitats is therefore essential to understand the evolution of these processes in response to environmental change.
Freshwater and OCeanic science Unit of reSearch - FOCUS
F.R.S.-FNRS - Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/233472
10.1007/s00442-019-04362-8
The final paginated version of this paper is also available on the publisher website (Springer): see DOI. The author version of the manuscript is available hereunder in open access.

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