Reference : Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in frying oils and snacks
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Food science
Physical, chemical, mathematical & earth Sciences : Chemistry
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/229654
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in frying oils and snacks
English
Purcaro, Giorgia mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Agronomie, Bio-ingénierie et Chimie (AgroBioChem) > Chimie des agro-biosystèmes >]
Navas, J. A. [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, CeRTA, University of Barcelona, Avinguda Joan XXII, E-08028 Barcelona, Spain]
Guardiola, F. [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, CeRTA, University of Barcelona, Avinguda Joan XXII, E-08028 Barcelona, Spain]
Conte, L. S. [Department of Food Science, University of Udine, Via Marangoni 97, 33100 Udine, Italy]
Moret, S. [Department of Food Science, University of Udine, Via Marangoni 97, 33100 Udine, Italy]
2006
Journal of Food Protection
IAMFES
69
1
199-204
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0362028X
[en] Arachis ; Arachis hypogaea
[en] The high incidence of lung cancer observed among Chinese women has been associated with exposure to fumes from cooking oil. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a class of potentially mutagenic substances emitted from cooking oils heated at high temperatures. The objective of this study was to investigate whether deep frying with different oils under different conditions leads to the development of PAHs either in the oil or in the fried product (snacks). PAH analysis was carried out with solid-phase extraction followed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and spectrofluorometric detection. Different oils were used to fry chips and extruded snacks in different industrial plants (continuous frying) at temperatures between 170 and 205°C, and peanut oil was used to fry French fries and fish (discontinuous frying) at temperatures between 160 and 185°C. No appreciable differences in PAH load was observed in the same oil before and after frying. Both before and after frying, the benzo[a]pyrene concentration in oils ranged from trace to 0.7 ppb. All the analyzed samples, including oils from fried snacks, had benzo[a]pyrene concentrations well below the 2 ppb limit recently proposed by the European Community. Copyright ©, International Association for Food Protection.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/229654
10.4315/0362-028X-69.1.199

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