Reference : Independent recollection/familiarity ratings can dissociate: Evidence from the effect...
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Theoretical & cognitive psychology
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Theoretical & cognitive psychology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/228864
Independent recollection/familiarity ratings can dissociate: Evidence from the effects of test context on recognition of event details
English
Willems, Sylvie* mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > > Clinique psychologique et logopédique universitaire (CPLU) >]
Schroyen, Sarah* mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Psychologie > Psychologie de la sénescence et du vieillissement >]
Dehon, Hedwige mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Psychologie > Psychologie clinique cognitive et comportementale >]
Bodner, Glen [Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia > College of Education > Psychology and Social Wor > >]
* These authors have contributed equally to this work.
Jun-2019
Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology
Canadian Psychological Association
73
2
100-104
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
1196-1961
Canada
[en] Recognition ; recollection ; eyewitness
[en] Bodner and Richardson-Champion (2007) found a dissociative effect of test context on binary remember/know judgments about a critical set of details from a film sequence. Details of medium difficulty were more likely to be judged “recollected” when preceded by a set of difficult details than a set of easy details, but were similarly likely to be judged “familiar”. Using the same paradigm, we replicated this dissociation when participants independently rated recollection and familiarity. Our finding represents the first evidence that independent recollection/familiarity ratings can be dissociated. In contrast, previous studies using independent ratings have yielded parallel effects of variables that produce dissociative effects with binary judgments. Our discussion considers potential causes of this dissociation, whether test context influenced discrimination or response bias, and implications for interpreting subjective recognition experiences. Demonstrations that test context can affect recollection reports also have implications for designing and conducting eyewitness interviews.
Researchers
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/228864
10.1037/cep0000159

File(s) associated to this reference

Fulltext file(s):

FileCommentaryVersionSizeAccess
Open access
WillemsSchroyenDehonBodner-CJEP-in press.pdfPublisher postprint170.49 kBView/Open

Bookmark and Share SFX Query

All documents in ORBi are protected by a user license.