Reference : Development and characterization of lipid-polymeric nanoparticles for oral insulin de...
Scientific journals : Article
Human health sciences : Pharmacy, pharmacology & toxicology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/217340
Development and characterization of lipid-polymeric nanoparticles for oral insulin delivery
English
Sgorla, Débora [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Paraná, Centro de Ciências Médicas e Farmacêuticas Department, Cascavel, Brazil > > > >]
Lechanteur, Anna mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > > R&D Direction : Chercheurs ULiège en mobilité >]
Almeida, Andreia [i3S – Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde, Universidade do Porto, Rua Alfredo Allen 208, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal > > > >]
Sousa, Flavia [i3S – Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde, Universidade do Porto, Rua Alfredo Allen 208, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal > > > >]
Melo, Edouardo [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Paraná, Centro de Ciências Médicas e Farmacêuticas Department, Cascavel, Brazil > > > >]
Bunhak, Élcio [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Paraná, Centro de Ciências Médicas e Farmacêuticas Department, Cascavel, Brazil > > > >]
Mainardes, Rubiana [Laboratório de Nanotecnologia - Departamento de. Farmácia, Universidade Estadual do Centro-Oeste, Brazil > > > >]
Khalil, Najeh [Laboratório de Nanotecnologia - Departamento de. Farmácia, Universidade Estadual do Centro-Oeste, Brazil > > > >]
Cavalcanti, Osvaldo [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Paraná, Centro de Ciências Médicas e Farmacêuticas Department, Cascavel, Brazil > > > >]
Sarmento, Bruno [i3S – Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde, Universidade do Porto, Rua Alfredo Allen 208, 4200-135 Porto, Portugal > > > >]
Dec-2017
Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
1742-5247
[en] Introduction: The oral route is widely accepted as the most physiological path for exogenous administration of insulin, as it closely mimic the endogenous insulin pathway. Thus, in this work it is proposed an innovative lipid-polymeric nanocarrier to delivery insulin orally.

Areas covered: Nanoparticles were produced through a modified solvent emulsification-evaporation method, using ethyl palmitate and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose acetate succinate as matrix. Lipid-polymeric nanoparticles were around 300 nm in size, negatively charged (-20 mV) and associated insulin with efficiency higher than 80%. Differential scanning calorimetry suggested thermal stability of nanoparticles. In vitro release assays under simulated gastrointestinal conditions resulted in 9% and 14% of insulin released at pH 1.2 during 2 h and at pH 6.8 for 6 h, respectively, demonstrating the ability of those nanoparticles to protect insulin against premature degradation. Importantly, nanoparticles were observed to be safe at potential therapeutic concentrations as did not originate cytotoxicity to intestinal epithelial cells. Lastly, the permeability of nanoencapsulated insulin through Caco-2 monolayers and a triple Caco-2/HT29-MTX/Raji B cell model correlated well with slow release kinetics, and fosters the effectiveness of nanoparticles to promote intestinal absorption of peptidic drugs.

Expert Opinion: Lipid-polymeric nanoparticles were developed to encapsulate and carry insulin through intestine. Overall, nanoparticles provide insulin stability and intestinal permeability.
Centre Interdisciplinaire de Recherche sur le Médicament - CIRM
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/217340
10.1080/17425247.2018.1420050

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