Reference : Morphological diversification of the endemic Antarctic fishes Trematominae (Nototheni...
Scientific congresses and symposiums : Poster
Life sciences : Environmental sciences & ecology
Life sciences : Zoology
Life sciences : Aquatic sciences & oceanology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/216264
Morphological diversification of the endemic Antarctic fishes Trematominae (Notothenioidei, Teleostei)
English
Frederich, Bruno mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Biologie, Ecologie et Evolution > Océanographie biologique >]
Heindler, Franz Maximilian [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven - KUL > > Laboratory of Biodiversity and Evolutionary Genomics > >]
Christiansen, Henrik [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven - KUL > > Laboratory of Biodiversity and Evolutionary Genomics > >]
Dettai, Agnès [Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, Paris > Département Systématique et Evolution > UMR 7138 > >]
Lepoint, Gilles mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Biologie, Ecologie et Evolution > Océanographie biologique >]
23-Nov-2017
A0
No
No
International
ZOOLOGY 2017 - 25th Benelux congress of Zoology
du 23 novembre au 24 novembre 2017
Royal Dutch Zoological Society
Royal Belgian Zoological Society
Wageningen
Pays-Bas
[en] geometric morphology ; fish ; antarctic ; evolution ; global change ; trophic ecology
[en] Adaptive radiation involves the early, rapid ecological and morphological diversification of multiple lineages from a common ancestor into new, diverging adaptive zones. Regarding this definition with emphasis on the tempo of diversification, Antarctic notothenioids represent one of the very few examples of adaptive radiation in marine fishes. Time-calibrated phylogenies suggest that the diversification of most speciose notothenioid lineages occured between 20 and 15 Ma. The subfamily Trematominae is one of those diverse subclades showing a large range of ecological niches. In the present study, we aim to describe the evolutionary history of Trematomus species. By combining a consensus time-tree and a geometric morphometric dataset, we first illustrate their pattern of cephalic shape diversification in a phylomorphospace and we infer the morphology of their common ancestor. We also explore whether the cephalic shape data shows a phylogenetic signal, which is defined as the statistical dependence among species trait values due to their phylogenetic relatedness. The combination of phylogenetic signal test and exploration of the phylomorphospace allows us to assess whether Trematomus rapidly diverged in various adaptive zones as expected under a classic scenario of adaptive radiation.
Freshwater and OCeanic science Unit of reSearch - FOCUS ; Centre Interfacultaire de Recherches en Océanologie - MARE
Politique Scientifique Fédérale (Belgique) = Belgian Federal Science Policy
Refugia and Ecosystem Tolerance in the Southern Ocean (RECTO)
Researchers
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/216264

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