Reference : Equine Atypical Myopathy in the UK: Epidemiological characteristics of cases reported...
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Veterinary medicine & animal health
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/211057
Equine Atypical Myopathy in the UK: Epidemiological characteristics of cases reported from 2011 to 2015 and factors associated with survival
English
Gonzalez-Medina, S. [The Royal Veterinary College, London, UK > Comparative Neuromuscular Diseases Laboratory > > >]
Ireland, J. L. [Epidemiology and Disease Surveillance, Animal Health Trust, Newmarket, Suffolk, UK > > > >]
Piercy, R. J. [The Royal Veterinary College, London, UK > Comparative Neuromuscular Diseases Laboratory > > >]
Newton, J. R. [Epidemiology and Disease Surveillance, Animal Health Trust, Newmarket, Suffolk, UK > > > >]
Votion, Dominique mailto [Université de Liège > FARAH > > >]
2017
Equine Veterinary Journal
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0425-1644
2042-3306
United States
[en] Horse ; Myopathy ; Atypical ; Survival ; CK ; Mitochondrial myopathy
[en] BACKGROUND: Equine atypical myopathy (AM) is a toxic rhabdomyolysis associated with ingestion of hypoglycin A, derived typically in Europe, from Acer pseudoplatanus tree. Despite the wide distribution of this tree species in the UK, the number of cases reported annually varies, and there has been an apparent increase in prevalence in recent years. Although AM was first recognised in the UK, epidemiological studies have never been conducted focused solely on this country. OBJECTIVES: To describe the spatiotemporal distribution, presentation, treatment and outcome of AM cases reported in the UK. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective case series. METHODS: British AM cases reported to the atypical myopathy alert website, between 2011 and 2015 were included (n = 224). Data were obtained via standardised epidemiological questionnaires from owners and veterinarians. Factors associated with survival were assessed using logistic regression. RESULTS: Most cases reported were from England (87.9%). Survival was 38.6% (n = 73/189). Clinical factors associated with reduced odds of survival included, hypothermia (odds ratio (OR) 0.18; CI 0.06-0.57; p = 0.01), bladder distension (OR 0.11; CI 0.02-0.59; p = 0.01), tachycardia (OR 0.97; CI 0.94-0.99; p = 0.04) and serum creatine kinase activity >100,000 IU/L (OR 0.17; CI 0.04-0.68; p = 0.01) in the univariable analysis as well as recumbency. The latter was the only sign retained in multivariable analysis (OR = 0.19; CI 0.06-0.62; p = 0.006). Administration of vitamins during the disease was associated with survival (OR 3.75; CI 1.21-11.57; p = 0.02). MAIN LIMITATIONS: Reporting cases to the atypical myopathy alert group is voluntary; therefore, under-reporting will result in underestimation of AM cases; furthermore, direct owner-reporting could have introduced misdiagnosis bias. CONCLUSION: Some areas of the UK reported AM cases more commonly. Clinical signs such as recumbency, rectal temperature, distended bladder and serum CK activity might be useful prognostic indicators though should be considered in the context of the clinical picture. Treatment with vitamins increases survival. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Fundamental and Applied Research for Animals and Health - FARAH
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/211057
10.1111/evj.12694

File(s) associated to this reference

Fulltext file(s):

FileCommentaryVersionSizeAccess
Restricted access
Gonzalez-MedinaS_EVJ_2017.pdfPublisher postprint698.01 kBRequest copy

Bookmark and Share SFX Query

All documents in ORBi are protected by a user license.