Reference : Elevated carbon dioxide concentration reduces alarm signaling in aphids
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Entomology & pest control
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/205149
Elevated carbon dioxide concentration reduces alarm signaling in aphids
English
Boullis, Antoine mailto [Université de Liège > Agronomie, Bio-ingénierie et Chimie (AgroBioChem) > Entomologie fonctionnelle et évolutive > >]
Fassotte, Bérénice mailto [Université de Liège > Agronomie, Bio-ingénierie et Chimie (AgroBioChem) > Entomologie fonctionnelle et évolutive > >]
Sarles, Landry mailto [Université de Liège > Agronomie, Bio-ingénierie et Chimie (AgroBioChem) > Entomologie fonctionnelle et évolutive > >]
Lognay, Georges mailto [Université de Liège > Agronomie, Bio-ingénierie et Chimie (AgroBioChem) > Analyse, qual. et risques - Labo. de Chimie analytique >]
Heuskin, Stéphanie mailto [Université de Liège > Agronomie, Bio-ingénierie et Chimie (AgroBioChem) > Analyse, qual. et risques - Labo. de Chimie analytique >]
Vanderplanck, Maryse mailto [Université de Mons - UMONS > Research Institute for Biosciences > > >]
Bartram, Stefan mailto [Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology > > > >]
Haubruge, Eric mailto [Université de Liège > Agronomie, Bio-ingénierie et Chimie (AgroBioChem) > Entomologie fonctionnelle et évolutive > >]
Francis, Frédéric mailto [Université de Liège > Agronomie, Bio-ingénierie et Chimie (AgroBioChem) > Entomologie fonctionnelle et évolutive >]
Verheggen, François mailto [Université de Liège > Agronomie, Bio-ingénierie et Chimie (AgroBioChem) > Entomologie fonctionnelle et évolutive >]
11-Jan-2017
Journal of Chemical Ecology
Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers
43
164-171
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0098-0331
1573-1561
New York
NY
[en] Carbon dioxide ; Acyrthosiphon pisum ; Predator-prey interaction ; (E)-beta-farnesene ; signal dynamic
[en] Insects often rely on olfaction to communicate with surrounding conspecifics. While the chemical language of insects has been deciphered in recent decades, few studies have assessed how changes in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations will impact pheromonal communication by insects. Here, we hypothesize that changes in the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) affect the whole dynamics of alarm signaling in aphids, including: (1) the production of the active compound (E)-β-farnesene (Eβf), (2) emission behavior when under attack, (3) perception by the olfactory apparatus, and (4) the escape response. We reared two strains of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum under ambient and elevated CO2 concentrations for several generations. We found that an increase in CO2 concentration reduced the production (i.e., individual content) and emission of Eβf (released under predation events). While no difference in Eβf neuronal perception was observed, we found that an increase in CO2 strongly reduces the escape behavior expressed by an aphid colony following exposure to natural doses of the alarm pheromone. In conclusion, our results confirm that changes to greenhouse gases do impact chemical communication in insects, and could potentially have a cascade effect on interactions with higher trophic levels.
Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique (Communauté française de Belgique) - F.R.S.-FNRS
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/205149
10.1007/s10886-017-0818-z

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