Reference : Feline panleukopenia virus in cerebral neurons of young and adult cats.
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Veterinary medicine & animal health
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/197414
Feline panleukopenia virus in cerebral neurons of young and adult cats.
English
Garigliany, Mutien-Marie [Université de Liège - ULiège > > >]
Gilliaux, Gautier mailto [Université de Liège > Département de morphologie et pathologie (DMP) > Département de morphologie et pathologie (DMP) >]
Jolly, Sandra [> >]
Casanova, Tomas [> >]
Bayrou, Calixte mailto [Université de Liège > Département de morphologie et pathologie (DMP) > Pathologie spéciale et autopsies >]
Gommeren, Kris mailto [Université de Liège > Dép. clinique des animaux de compagnie et des équidés (DCA) > Pathologie médicale des petits animaux >]
Fett, Thomas mailto [Université de Liège > Département des maladies infectieuses et parasitaires (DMI) > Santé et pathologies de la faune sauvage >]
Mauroy, Axel mailto [Université de Liège > Département des maladies infectieuses et parasitaires (DMI) > Virologie vétérinaire et maladies virales animales >]
Levy, Etienne mailto [Université de Liège > Département de morphologie et pathologie (DMP) > Pathologie spéciale et autopsies >]
Cassart, Dominique mailto [Université de Liège > Département de morphologie et pathologie (DMP) > Département de morphologie et pathologie (DMP) >]
Peeters, Dominique mailto [Université de Liège > Dép. clinique des animaux de compagnie et des équidés (DCA) > Médecine interne des animaux de compagnie >]
Poncelet, Luc [> >]
Desmecht, Daniel mailto [Université de Liège > Département de morphologie et pathologie (DMP) > Pathologie spéciale et autopsies >]
2016
BMC veterinary research
12
1
28
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
1746-6148
1746-6148
England
[en] BACKGROUND: Perinatal infections with feline panleukopenia virus (FPV) have long been known to be associated with cerebellar hypoplasia in kittens due to productive infection of dividing neuroblasts. FPV, like other parvoviruses, requires dividing cells to replicate which explains the usual tropism of the virus for the digestive tract, lymphoid tissues and bone marrow in older animals. RESULTS: In this study, the necropsy and histopathological analyses of a series of 28 cats which died from parvovirus infection in 2013 were performed. Infections were confirmed by real time PCR and immunohistochemistry in several organs. Strikingly, while none of these cats showed cerebellar atrophy or cerebellar positive immunostaining, some of them, including one adult, showed a bright positive immunostaining for viral antigens in cerebral neurons (diencephalon). Furthermore, infected neurons were negative by immunostaining for p27(Kip1), a cell cycle regulatory protein, while neighboring, uninfected, neurons were positive, suggesting a possible re-entry of infected neurons into the mitotic cycle. Next-Generation Sequencing and PCR analyses showed that the virus infecting cat brains was FPV and presented a unique substitution in NS1 protein sequence. Given the role played by this protein in the control of cell cycle and apoptosis in other parvoviral species, it is tempting to hypothesize that a cause-to-effect between this NS1 mutation and the capacity of this FPV strain to infect neurons in adult cats might exist. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides the first evidence of infection of cerebral neurons by feline panleukopenia virus in cats, including an adult. A possible re-entry into the cell cycle by infected neurons has been observed. A mutation in the NS1 protein sequence of the FPV strain involved could be related to its unusual cellular tropism. Further research is needed to clarify this point.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/197414
10.1186/s12917-016-0657-0

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