Reference : Brains creating stories of selves: the neural basis of autobiographical reasoning.
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Neurosciences & behavior
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/145494
Brains creating stories of selves: the neural basis of autobiographical reasoning.
English
D'Argembeau, Arnaud mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Psychologie : cognition et comportement > Psychopathologie cognitive >]
Cassol, Helena [> >]
Phillips, Christophe mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron >]
Balteau, Evelyne mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron >]
Salmon, Eric mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département des sciences cliniques > Neuroimagerie des troubles de la mémoire et révalid. cogn. >]
Van der Linden, Martial mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Psychologie : cognition et comportement > Psychopathologie cognitive >]
2014
Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
Oxford University Press
9
646-652
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
1749-5016
1749-5024
Oxford
United Kingdom
[en] Personal identity critically depends on the creation of stories about the self and one's life. The present study investigates the neural substrates of autobiographical reasoning, a process central to the construction of such narratives. During fMRI scanning, participants approached a set of personally significant memories in two different ways: on some trials, they remembered the concrete content of the events (autobiographical remembering), whereas on other trials they reflected on the broader meaning and implications of their memories (autobiographical reasoning). Relative to remembering, autobiographical reasoning recruited a left-lateralized network involved in conceptual processing (including the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), inferior frontal gyrus, middle temporal gyrus, and angular gyrus). The ventral MPFC-an area that may function to generate personal/affective meaning-was not consistently engaged during autobiographical reasoning across participants but, interestingly, the activity of this region was modulated by individual differences in interest and willingness to engage in self-reflection. These findings support the notion that autobiographical reasoning and the construction of personal narratives go beyond mere remembering in that they require deriving meaning and value from past experiences.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/145494
10.1093/scan/nst028

File(s) associated to this reference

Fulltext file(s):

FileCommentaryVersionSizeAccess
Restricted access
D'Argembeau et al_SCAN_2014.pdfPublisher postprint403.17 kBRequest copy

Bookmark and Share SFX Query

All documents in ORBi are protected by a user license.