Reference : Connectivity changes underlying spectral EEG changes during propofol-induced loss of ...
Scientific journals : Article
Human health sciences : Anesthesia & intensive care
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/138135
Connectivity changes underlying spectral EEG changes during propofol-induced loss of consciousness.
English
Boly, Mélanie mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département des sciences cliniques > Neurologie >]
Moran, Rosalyn [> >]
Murphy, Michael [> >]
BOVEROUX, Pierre mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Anesthésie et réanimation >]
Bruno, Marie-Aurélie mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron >]
Noirhomme, Quentin mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron >]
LEDOUX, Didier mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Soins intensifs >]
BONHOMME, Vincent mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Anesthésie et réanimation >]
BRICHANT, Jean-François mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Anesthésie et réanimation >]
Tononi, Giulio [> >]
Laureys, Steven [Université de Liège - ULiège > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron >]
Friston, Karl [> >]
2012
The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience
32
20
7082-90
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0270-6474
1529-2401
United States
[en] Adult ; Anesthetics, Intravenous/pharmacology ; Bayes Theorem ; Brain Waves/drug effects/physiology ; Conscious Sedation ; Electroencephalography/methods ; Female ; Frontal Lobe/drug effects/physiology ; Humans ; Hypnotics and Sedatives/pharmacology ; Male ; Models, Neurological ; Neural Pathways/drug effects/physiology ; Parietal Lobe/drug effects/physiology ; Propofol/pharmacology ; Thalamus/drug effects/physiology ; Unconsciousness/chemically induced/physiopathology ; Wakefulness/physiology
[en] The mechanisms underlying anesthesia-induced loss of consciousness remain a matter of debate. Recent electrophysiological reports suggest that while initial propofol infusion provokes an increase in fast rhythms (from beta to gamma range), slow activity (from delta to alpha range) rises selectively during loss of consciousness. Dynamic causal modeling was used to investigate the neural mechanisms mediating these changes in spectral power in humans. We analyzed source-reconstructed data from frontal and parietal cortices during normal wakefulness, propofol-induced mild sedation, and loss of consciousness. Bayesian model selection revealed that the best model for explaining spectral changes across the three states involved changes in corticothalamic interactions. Compared with wakefulness, mild sedation was accounted for by an increase in thalamic excitability, which did not further increase during loss of consciousness. In contrast, loss of consciousness per se was accompanied by a decrease in backward corticocortical connectivity from frontal to parietal cortices, while thalamocortical connectivity remained unchanged. These results emphasize the importance of recurrent corticocortical communication in the maintenance of consciousness and suggest a direct effect of propofol on cortical dynamics.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/138135
10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3769-11.2012

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