Reference : A technique for resection of invasive tumors involving the trigone area of the bladde...
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Veterinary medicine & animal health
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/8767
A technique for resection of invasive tumors involving the trigone area of the bladder in dogs: preliminary results in two dogs.
English
Saulnier-Troff, Francois-Guillaume [> > > >]
Busoni, Valeria mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département clinique des animaux de compagnie et des équidés > Imagerie médicale >]
Hamaide, Annick mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département clinique des animaux de compagnie et des équidés > Département clinique des animaux de compagnie et des équidés >]
2008
Veterinary Surgery : The Official Journal of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons
W.B. Saunders
37
5
427-37
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0161-3499
1532-950X
Orlando
United States
[en] Animals ; Carcinoma, Transitional Cell/surgery/veterinary ; Dog Diseases/surgery ; Dogs ; Female ; Rhabdomyosarcoma/surgery/veterinary ; Treatment Outcome ; Urethral Obstruction/epidemiology/etiology/veterinary ; Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/surgery/veterinary ; Urinary Incontinence/epidemiology/etiology/veterinary ; Urinary Tract/pathology/surgery
[en] OBJECTIVE: To describe a surgical technique for resection of the entire bladder neck, including the trigone and proximal urethra in dogs with invasive tumors causing life-threatening urinary tract obstruction. STUDY DESIGN: Clinical case reports. ANIMALS: Dogs (n=2) with bladder tumors. METHODS: Circumferential excision of the bladder neck and proximal urethra with preservation of the neurovascular pedicles was performed to remove a rhabdomyosarcoma (dog 1) and a transitional cell carcinoma (dog 2) involving the trigone and bladder neck that were causing urinary tract obstruction. Reconstruction of the bladder and proximal urethra included bilateral ureteroneocystostomy. Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered postoperatively to both dogs. RESULTS: Postoperatively, dogs 1 and 2 were continent after 7 and 17 days, respectively, and regained normal urinary function after resolution of a transient pollakiuria. Dog 1 had no evidence of local or regional recurrence; however, a large solitary pulmonary metastatic lesion was diagnosed 8 months later. The dog was euthanatized despite a lack of clinical signs. Dog 2 had at least 1 metastatic lesion in the abdominal wall 6 months later and was euthanatized at 580 days because of renal failure. CONCLUSION: En-bloc removal of the bladder neck and proximal urethra with preservation of the dorsal vascular and nervous pedicles, although a technically challenging procedure, can be performed without associated urinary incontinence or bladder wall necrosis. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: In dogs with invasive bladder tumors causing life-threatening urinary tract obstruction, resection of the bladder neck and proximal urethra should be considered as a promising surgical alternative to urinary diversion.
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/8767
10.1111/j.1532-950X.2008.00406.x

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