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Determinants of COVID-19 vaccine intention in a University population: a serial mediation approach
Paridans, Marine; Dardenne, Nadia; Donneau, Anne-Françoise et al.
2023In European Journal of Public Health, 33 (Supplement_2)
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Keywords :
Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
Abstract :
[en] Abstract Background While many studies have used the Health Belief Model (HBM) to understand vaccination intention, few have explored the relationships between the HBM constructs. The aim of this study is to develop a serial mediation model dealing with latent variables to assess direct and indirect effects of the six HBM constructs (perceived susceptibility, severity, benefits, barriers, self-efficacy and cue to action) on COVID-19 vaccine intention. Methods From April to June 2021, a questionnaire on vaccine intention against COVID-19 was administered to staff and students at the University of Liège (Belgium). To evaluate direct and indirect effects of the HBM constructs on vaccine intention (score 0-100), serial mediation models for each latent variable permutation were assessed with Partial Least Squares Path Modeling (PLS-PM). Bayesian information criterion (BIC) was used to compare models. Internal consistency reliability and discriminant validity were evaluated. Sociodemographic variables, health literacy, psychological profile, body mass index, chronic disease and previous COVID-19 infection were included in the models as covariates. Results The sample consisted of 1256 participants. After running all permutation chains, the final causal chain, with the lowest BIC value, was barriers (-0.09 (-0.15 - -0.03))* - severity (-0.13 (-0.20 - -0.07))* - low self-efficacy (0.20 (0.15 - 0.25))* - low susceptibility (-0.55 (-0.60 - -0.51))* - vaccine intention (outcome). This highlighted a significant indirect and direct effect (-0.20 (-0.25 - -0.15))* between barriers and vaccine intention. Constructs benefits and cue to action were removed due to no significant path and weak reliability. Non-significant confounding factors were also removed. *estimate Conclusions The results showed that perceived barriers are a key determinant of COVID-19 vaccine resistance. Public health actors should communicate messages to remove barriers that reduce vaccine intention primarily. Key messages • Serial mediations allow a better understanding of how a vaccination intention works. • Public health communications should primarily focus on messages to remove barriers to get vaccinated.
Disciplines :
Public health, health care sciences & services
Author, co-author :
Paridans, Marine  ;  Université de Liège - ULiège > Santé publique : de la Biostatistique à la Promotion de la Santé
Dardenne, Nadia  ;  Université de Liège - ULiège > Département des sciences de la santé publique
Donneau, Anne-Françoise ;  Université de Liège - ULiège > Département des sciences de la santé publique
Gillet, Laurent  ;  Université de Liège - ULiège > Département des maladies infectieuses et parasitaires (DMI) > Vaccinologie vétérinaire
Bureau, Fabrice ;  Université de Liège - ULiège > GIGA > GIGA Inflammation, Infection & Immunity
Guillaume, Michèle ;  Université de Liège - ULiège > Département des sciences de la santé publique > Santé publique : aspects spécifiques
Pétré, Benoît  ;  Université de Liège - ULiège > Département des sciences de la santé publique > Education thérapeutique du patient au service des soins intégrés
Language :
English
Title :
Determinants of COVID-19 vaccine intention in a University population: a serial mediation approach
Publication date :
01 October 2023
Event name :
16th European Public Health Conference - Our Food, Our Health, Our Earth, A Sustainable Future for Humanity
Event place :
Dublin, Ireland
Event date :
8-11 November 2023
Audience :
International
Journal title :
European Journal of Public Health
ISSN :
1101-1262
eISSN :
1464-360X
Publisher :
Oxford University Press (OUP)
Volume :
33
Issue :
Supplement_2
Peer reviewed :
Peer Reviewed verified by ORBi
Available on ORBi :
since 19 January 2024

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