Article (Scientific journals)
Long-Term Multicolumn-Lead Spinal Cord Stimulation Efficacy in Patients with Failed Back Surgery Syndrome: A Six-Year Prospective Follow-up Study.
Remacle, Thibault; Mauviel, Stephane; Renwart, Henri-Jean et al.
2020In World Neurosurgery, 142, p. 245 - e252
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Keywords :
Failed back surgery syndrome; Follow-up studies; Patient outcome assessment; Spinal cord stimulation; Analgesics; Analgesics/therapeutic use; Failed Back Surgery Syndrome/physiopathology; Failed Back Surgery Syndrome/therapy; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Pain Measurement; Patient Outcome Assessment; Prospective Studies; Spinal Cord Stimulation/methods; Treatment Outcome; Activities of Daily Living; Sleep; Surgery; Neurology (clinical)
Abstract :
[en] OBJECTIVE: The use of multicolumn-lead spinal cord stimulation (SCS) to control back pain (BP) and leg pain (LP) in patients with failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) in the short term and mid-term has been well documented. Our study investigated whether SCS remained efficient after 72 months. METHODS: In an observational, single-center study, we assessed SCS efficacy in 62 patients with FBSS patients. BP, LP, and magnitude of daily activity limitation (DAL) were graded using a 0-10 visual analog scale (VAS) preoperatively and at 2, 6, 12, 24, 36, and 72 months after SCS implantation. Sleep quality, use of medications, and complications were also recorded. RESULTS: Of the 62 patients, 15 with complete follow-up data available were still using their SCS device at 72 months (SCS+). For these patients, the VAS scores for BP, LP, and DAL had changed from a median of 9 (interquartile range [IQR], 8.5-10), 7 (IQR, 6-8), and 8 (IQR, 8-9) preoperatively to a median of 4 (IQR, 3-4.5), 3 (IQR, 1.5-3.5), and 3 (IQR, 2-4) at 72 months. Their quality of sleep and analgesic medication consumption had also improved. In a subset of patients no longer using the SCS device after 72 months (SCS-), the VAS scores for BP, LP, and DAL, quality of sleep, and medication consumption were comparable to those for the SCS+ group. The SCS- group was less satisfied with the technique and were less professionally active than were the SCS+ group. CONCLUSIONS: The SCS device provides sustained beneficial effects on BP, LP, DAL, sleep, and medication consumption in patients with FBSS still using it at 72 months postoperatively. Further studies are needed to identify the factors of adherence to the technique and the chances of success compared with the natural evolution of FBSS.
Disciplines :
Anesthesia & intensive care
Author, co-author :
Remacle, Thibault ;  Department of Neurosurgery, Regional Hospital Center Citadelle, Liege, Belgium, Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Center Liege, Liege, Belgium.
Mauviel, Stephane;  Department of Algology, Regional Hospital Center Citadelle, Liege, Belgium
Renwart, Henri-Jean;  Department of Neurosurgery, Regional Hospital Center Citadelle, Liege, Belgium
Ghassempour, Keyvan;  Department of Neurosurgery, Regional Hospital Center Citadelle, Liege, Belgium
Belle, Frederic;  Department of Neurosurgery, Regional Hospital Center Citadelle, Liege, Belgium
Lückers, Olivier;  Department of Neurosurgery, Regional Hospital Center Citadelle, Liege, Belgium
Bex, Vincent;  Department of Neurosurgery, Regional Hospital Center Citadelle, Liege, Belgium
Remacle, Jean-Michel;  Department of Neurosurgery, Regional Hospital Center Citadelle, Liege, Belgium
Bonhomme, Vincent  ;  Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Service d'anesthésie - réanimation
Language :
English
Title :
Long-Term Multicolumn-Lead Spinal Cord Stimulation Efficacy in Patients with Failed Back Surgery Syndrome: A Six-Year Prospective Follow-up Study.
Publication date :
October 2020
Journal title :
World Neurosurgery
ISSN :
1878-8750
eISSN :
1878-8769
Publisher :
Elsevier Inc., United States
Volume :
142
Pages :
e245 - e252
Peer reviewed :
Peer Reviewed verified by ORBi
Funding text :
Conflict of interest statement: The present study was supported by the Department of Neurosurgery, CHR Citadelle, Liege, Belgium. Jean-Michel Remacle has received financial support for other research from Medtronic and Depuy Synthes; Vincent Bonhomme has received financial and technical help for other research from Orion Pharma and Metrodoloris and honoraria for consultancy from Medtronic.Conflict of interest statement: The present study was supported by the Department of Neurosurgery, CHR Citadelle, Liege, Belgium. Jean-Michel Remacle has received financial support for other research from Medtronic and Depuy Synthes; Vincent Bonhomme has received financial and technical help for other research from Orion Pharma and Metrodoloris and honoraria for consultancy from Medtronic.
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