Article (Scientific journals)
Wireless wearables for postoperative surveillance on surgical wards: a survey of 1158 anaesthesiologists in Western Europe and the USA.
Michard, Frederic; Thiele, Robert H; Saugel, Bernd et al.
2022In BJA Open, 1, p. 100002
Peer Reviewed verified by ORBi
 

Files


Full Text
BJA open 2022.pdf
Author postprint (461.64 kB)
Request a copy

All documents in ORBi are protected by a user license.

Send to



Details



Keywords :
anaesthesiology; failure to rescue; monitoring; patient safety; postoperative complications; surgery; wearables
Abstract :
[en] [en] BACKGROUND: Several continuous monitoring solutions, including wireless wearable sensors, are available or being developed to improve patient surveillance on surgical wards. We designed a survey to understand the current perception and expectations of anaesthesiologists who, as perioperative physicians, are increasingly involved in postoperative care. METHODS: The survey was shared in 40 university hospitals from Western Europe and the USA. RESULTS: From 5744 anaesthesiologists who received the survey link, there were 1158 valid questionnaires available for analysis. Current postoperative surveillance was mainly based on intermittent spot-checks of vital signs every 4-6 h in the USA (72%) and every 8-12 h in Europe (53%). A majority of respondents (91%) considered that continuous monitoring of vital signs should be available on surgical wards and that wireless sensors are preferable to tethered systems (86%). Most respondents indicated that oxygen saturation (93%), heart rate (80%), and blood pressure (71%) should be continuously monitored with wrist devices (71%) or skin adhesive patches (54%). They believed it may help detect clinical deterioration earlier (90%), decrease rescue interventions (59%), and decrease hospital mortality (54%). Opinions diverged regarding the impact on nurse workload (increase 46%, decrease 39%), and most respondents considered that the biggest implementation challenges are economic (79%) and connectivity issues (64%). CONCLUSION: Continuous monitoring of vital signs with wireless sensors is wanted by most anaesthesiologists from university hospitals in Western Europe and in the USA. They believe it may improve patient safety and outcome, but may also be challenging to implement because of cost and connectivity issues.
Disciplines :
Anesthesia & intensive care
Author, co-author :
Michard, Frederic;  MiCo, Denens, Switzerland
Thiele, Robert H;  Department of Anesthesiology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA
Saugel, Bernd;  Department of Anesthesiology, Center of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany ; Outcomes Research Consortium, Cleveland, OH, USA
Joosten, Alexandre;  Department of Anesthesiology, University Paris Saclay, Paul Brousse Hospital, Villejuif, France
Flick, Moritz;  Department of Anesthesiology, Center of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany
Khanna, Ashish K;  Outcomes Research Consortium, Cleveland, OH, USA ; Department of Anesthesiology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA
Collaborators in Europe
Bonhomme, Vincent  ;  Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Service d'anesthésie - réanimation
Collaborators in the USA
Language :
English
Title :
Wireless wearables for postoperative surveillance on surgical wards: a survey of 1158 anaesthesiologists in Western Europe and the USA.
Publication date :
March 2022
Journal title :
BJA Open
eISSN :
2772-6096
Publisher :
Elsevier BV, England
Volume :
1
Pages :
100002
Peer reviewed :
Peer Reviewed verified by ORBi
Available on ORBi :
since 23 November 2023

Statistics


Number of views
2 (0 by ULiège)
Number of downloads
0 (0 by ULiège)

Scopus citations®
 
4
Scopus citations®
without self-citations
1
OpenCitations
 
3

Bibliography


Similar publications



Contact ORBi