Article (Scientific journals)
Patient-reported outcome, perception and satisfaction after laparoscopic cholecystectomy in Kigali, Rwanda.
Nyundo, Martin; Kayondo, King; Gasakure, Miguel et al.
2023In Surgery Open Science, 15, p. 67 - 72
Peer reviewed
 

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Keywords :
Complications; Experience; Laparoscopic cholecystectomy laparoscopic surgery; Minimally invasive surgery; Outcome; Satisfaction; Surgery
Abstract :
[en] [en] BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic surgery is the gold standard for many abdominal surgeries. Laparoscopic programs in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) and in sub-Saharan Africa face many constraints, although its use is safe, feasible, and clinically beneficial. The authors assessed patient-reported outcomes and the experience of patients operated on at the University Teaching Hospital of Kigali (CHUK). METHODS: This is a retrospective cross-sectional study combining medical data from medical files and information collected from telephone calls to 288 patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy at CHUK from January 2015 to December 2020. RESULTS: Among 446 laparoscopic surgeries performed at CHUK over 6 years, cholecystectomies accounted for 64.6 % of cases (288/446). Postoperative complications and mortality after laparoscopic cholecystectomy were low, respectively 1.7 % and 0.7 %, while the median length of stay was 3 days. About 74 % of surveyed patients had never heard of laparoscopic surgery prior to their procedure. Knowledge of laparoscopic surgery was associated with patient education level (p < 0.001). Half of patients had not been involved in the choice of the surgical technique. Overall satisfaction was over 95 % and >90 % of patients consider laparoscopic surgery as the best surgical approach in Rwanda, and for this reason they declared to be ready to promote this new technology despite its higher cost. However, patients reported some weaknesses and made recommendations for improving public awareness of laparoscopy and its benefits, patient-provider relationships, training of surgical workforce, laparoscopic equipment, and infrastructure. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy can be performed with a low rate of postoperative complications in a resource-limited setting like Rwanda. Patient satisfaction was high, but efforts should be made to improve public awareness of laparoscopic surgery, improve surgical capacity, laparoscopic equipment, and infrastructure.
Disciplines :
Surgery
Author, co-author :
Nyundo, Martin ;  Université de Liège - ULiège > Faculté de Médecine > Form. doct. sc. méd. (paysage) ; Department of Surgery, University Teaching Hospital of Kigali, University of Rwanda, Rwanda
Kayondo, King;  Department of Surgery, Rwanda Military Hospital, Kigali, Rwanda
Gasakure, Miguel;  Department of Surgery, University Teaching Hospital of Kigali, University of Rwanda, Rwanda
Urimubabo, Jean Christian;  Department of Surgery, University Teaching Hospital of Kigali, University of Rwanda, Rwanda
Houben, Jean Jacques;  Department of Abdominal Surgery, ERASME Hospital, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium
Limgba, Augustin;  Department of Abdominal Surgery, King Faisal Hospital, Kigali, Rwanda
Nifasha, Antoine;  Department of Surgery, University Teaching Hospital of Kigali, University of Rwanda, Rwanda
Gashegu, Julien;  Department of Surgery, University Teaching Hospital of Kigali, University of Rwanda, Rwanda ; Clinical Anatomy Department, University of Rwanda, Rwanda
Detry, Olivier  ;  Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Service de chirurgie abdo, sénologique, endocrine et de transplantation
Language :
English
Title :
Patient-reported outcome, perception and satisfaction after laparoscopic cholecystectomy in Kigali, Rwanda.
Publication date :
September 2023
Journal title :
Surgery Open Science
ISSN :
2589-8450
eISSN :
2589-8450
Publisher :
Elsevier B.V., United States
Volume :
15
Pages :
67 - 72
Peer reviewed :
Peer reviewed
Funders :
ARES - Académie de Recherche et d'Enseignement Supérieur [BE]
WBI - Wallonie-Bruxelles International [BE]
Funding text :
The authors wish to extend their appreciation and gratitude to Académie de Recherche et d'Enseignement Supérieur (ARES), Wallonia, Belgium, for the financial support.This research was partly funded by the Académie de Recherche et d'Enseignement Supérieur (ARES), Wallonie-Bruxelles International , through Belgian cooperation under the ARES Projet de Formation Sud (PFS) 2018 – Rwanda.
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since 27 October 2023

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