Article (Scientific journals)
The effect of increasing fine sediment load and drying duration on the re-emergence of Gammarus pulex (Amphipoda: Gammaridae) from the subsurface following flow resumption
Vadher, Atish N.; Watson, Sian; Copeland-Phillips, Ruth et al.
2022In Freshwater Biology, 67 (11), p. 1984 - 1993
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Keywords :
direct observation; Hyporheic refuge; intermittent flow; recovery; sedimentation; Aquatic Science
Abstract :
[en] Environmental change and growing anthropogenic pressure on water resources is increasing the duration and intensity of drying events in streams in many geographical locations. Favourable sediment characteristics (e.g. high porosity and low fine sediment load within the substrate matrix) may facilitate benthic macroinvertebrate use of subsurface sediments in response to drying. However, the influence of sedimentary characteristics on the use and subsequent recovery of macroinvertebrates from initial vertical migration into, survival during unfavourable conditions within, and subsequent re-emergence from subsurface sediments have not been directly observed. Transparent mesocosm tanks were used to directly observe the vertical movement and subsequent re-emergence of Gammarus pulex from subsurface sediments in response to increasing dry period (1, 7, or 21 days) and fine sediment load (0.5–1 mm particle diameter used for light and heavy sediment treatment) and following rehydration and resumption of flowing conditions. Increasing volumes of fine sediment addition limited the ability of G. pulex to access subsurface sediment in response to drying and re-emerge following rehydration. The longest dry period (21 days) reduced the ability of G. pulex to re-emerge from the subsurface sediments following rehydration and flow resumption. Increasing fine sediment load negatively affects taxa using subsurface sediments as a refuge. Increased fine sediment deposition has the potential to reduce both access to the sub-surface and re-emergence once surface flow resumes. As many rivers are beginning to dry out, or are showing prolonged drying due to global warming, it is increasingly important that river management reduces the input of fine sediment into rivers and increase sediment porosity of riverbeds to facilitate access into the subsurface refuge by benthic fauna.
Disciplines :
Environmental sciences & ecology
Author, co-author :
Vadher, Atish N. ;  Faculty of Arts, Science and Technology, University of Northampton, Northampton, United Kingdom
Watson, Sian;  Faculty of Arts, Science and Technology, University of Northampton, Northampton, United Kingdom
Copeland-Phillips, Ruth;  Faculty of Arts, Science and Technology, University of Northampton, Northampton, United Kingdom
Durrant, Louis ;  Université de Liège - ULiège > Département ArGEnCo > LEMA (Local environment management and analysis)
Wood, Paul J. ;  Geography and Environment, Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom
Language :
English
Title :
The effect of increasing fine sediment load and drying duration on the re-emergence of Gammarus pulex (Amphipoda: Gammaridae) from the subsurface following flow resumption
Publication date :
November 2022
Journal title :
Freshwater Biology
ISSN :
0046-5070
eISSN :
1365-2427
Publisher :
John Wiley and Sons Inc
Volume :
67
Issue :
11
Pages :
1984 - 1993
Peer reviewed :
Peer Reviewed verified by ORBi
Funding text :
A.N.V. and S.W. gratefully acknowledge the University of Northampton, Faculty of Arts, Science and Technology for providing support towards this project.
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