Article (Scientific journals)
Effects of a mindfulness-based versus a health self-management intervention on objective cognitive performance in older adults with subjective cognitive decline (SCD): a secondary analysis of the SCD-Well randomized controlled trial.
Whitfield, Tim; Demnitz-King, Harriet; Schlosser, Marco et al.
2022In Alzheimer's Research and Therapy, 14 (1), p. 125
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Keywords :
Mindfulness; Compassion; Cognition; Subjective cognitive decline; Randomized controlled trial
Abstract :
[en] BACKGROUND: Older individuals with subjective cognitive decline (SCD) perceive that their cognition has declined but do not show objective impairment on neuropsychological tests. Individuals with SCD are at elevated risk of objective cognitive decline and incident dementia. Non-pharmacological interventions (including mindfulness-based and health self-management approaches) are a potential strategy to maintain or improve cognition in SCD, which may ultimately reduce dementia risk. METHODS: This study utilized data from the SCD-Well randomized controlled trial. One hundred forty-seven older adults with SCD (MAge = 72.7 years; 64% female) were recruited from memory clinics in four European countries and randomized to one of two group-based, 8-week interventions: a Caring Mindfulness-based Approach for Seniors (CMBAS) or a health self-management program (HSMP). Participants were assessed at baseline, post-intervention (week 8), and at 6-month follow-up (week 24) using a range of cognitive tests. From these tests, three composites were derived-an "abridged" Preclinical Alzheimer's Cognitive Composite 5 (PACC5Abridged), an attention composite, and an executive function composite. Both per-protocol and intention-to-treat analyses were performed. Linear mixed models evaluated the change in outcomes between and within arms and adjusted for covariates and cognitive retest effects. Sensitivity models repeated the per-protocol analyses for participants who attended ≥ 4 intervention sessions. RESULTS: Across all cognitive composites, there were no significant time-by-trial arm interactions and no measurable cognitive retest effects; sensitivity analyses supported these results. Improvements, however, were observed within both trial arms on the PACC5Abridged from baseline to follow-up (Δ [95% confidence interval]: CMBAS = 0.34 [0.19, 0.48]; HSMP = 0.30 [0.15, 0.44]). There was weaker evidence of an improvement in attention but no effects on executive function. CONCLUSIONS: Two non-pharmacological interventions conferred small, non-differing improvements to a global cognitive composite sensitive to amyloid-beta-related decline. There was weaker evidence of an effect on attention, and no evidence of an effect on executive function. Importantly, observed improvements were maintained beyond the end of the interventions. Improving cognition is an important step toward dementia prevention, and future research is needed to delineate the mechanisms of action of these interventions and to utilize clinical endpoints (i.e., progression to mild cognitive impairment or dementia). TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03005652.
Research center :
GIGA CRC (Cyclotron Research Center) In vivo Imaging-Aging & Memory - ULiège
Disciplines :
Theoretical & cognitive psychology
Author, co-author :
Whitfield, Tim;  Division of Psychiatry, University College London, 6th Floor Maple House, 149 Tottenham Court Road, London, W1T 7NF, UK
Demnitz-King, Harriet;  Division of Psychiatry, University College London, 6th Floor Maple House, 149 Tottenham Court Road, London, W1T 7NF, UK
Schlosser, Marco;  Division of Psychiatry, University College London, 6th Floor Maple House, 149 Tottenham Court Road, London, W1T 7NF, UK ; Department of Psychology, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
Barnhofer, Thorsten;  School of Psychology, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK
Frison, Eric;  Bordeaux Population Health Center, University of Bordeaux, INSERM, EUCLID/F-CRIN Clinical Trials Platform, CHU Bordeaux, F-33000, Bordeaux, France ; Service d'information médicale, CHU Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France
Coll-Padros, Nina;  Alzheimer's Disease and Other Cognitive Disorders Unit, Hospital Clinic, IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain
Dautricourt, Sophie;  Normandie University, UNICAEN, INSERM, U1237, PhIND "Physiopathology and Imaging of Neurological Disorders", Institut Blood and Brain @ Caen-Normandie, Cyceron, 14000, Caen, France ; Neurology Department, University Hospital, Caen, France
Requier, Florence  ;  Université de Liège - ULiège > Psychologie et Neuroscience Cognitives (PsyNCog)
Delarue, Marion;  Normandie University, UNICAEN, INSERM, U1237, PhIND "Physiopathology and Imaging of Neurological Disorders", Institut Blood and Brain @ Caen-Normandie, Cyceron, 14000, Caen, France
Gonneaud, Julie;  Normandie University, UNICAEN, INSERM, U1237, PhIND "Physiopathology and Imaging of Neurological Disorders", Institut Blood and Brain @ Caen-Normandie, Cyceron, 14000, Caen, France
Klimecki, Olga M;  Clinical Psychology and Behavioral Neuroscience, Faculty of Psychology, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany
Lutz, Antoine;  Lyon Neuroscience Research Center Inserm U1028, CNRS UMR5292, Lyon 1 University, Lyon, France
Paly, Léo;  Normandie University, UNICAEN, INSERM, U1237, PhIND "Physiopathology and Imaging of Neurological Disorders", Institut Blood and Brain @ Caen-Normandie, Cyceron, 14000, Caen, France
Salmon, Eric  ;  Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Service de neurologie
Schild, Ann-Katrin;  Department of Psychiatry, Medical Faculty, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany
Walker, Zuzana;  Division of Psychiatry, University College London, 6th Floor Maple House, 149 Tottenham Court Road, London, W1T 7NF, UK ; Essex Partnership University NHS Foundation Trust, Wickford, UK
Jessen, Frank;  Department of Psychiatry, Medical Faculty, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany ; Excellence Cluster on Cellular Stress Responses in Aging-Associated Diseases (CECAD), University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany ; German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Bonn, Germany
Chételat, Gaël;  Normandie University, UNICAEN, INSERM, U1237, PhIND "Physiopathology and Imaging of Neurological Disorders", Institut Blood and Brain @ Caen-Normandie, Cyceron, 14000, Caen, France
Collette, Fabienne  ;  Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Psychologie
Wirth, Miranka;  German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Dresden, Germany
Marchant, Natalie L;  Division of Psychiatry, University College London, 6th Floor Maple House, 149 Tottenham Court Road, London, W1T 7NF, UK. n.marchant@ucl.ac.uk
Medit-Ageing Research Group
More authors (12 more) Less
Language :
English
Title :
Effects of a mindfulness-based versus a health self-management intervention on objective cognitive performance in older adults with subjective cognitive decline (SCD): a secondary analysis of the SCD-Well randomized controlled trial.
Publication date :
06 September 2022
Journal title :
Alzheimer's Research and Therapy
eISSN :
1758-9193
Publisher :
Springer Science and Business Media LLC, England
Volume :
14
Issue :
1
Pages :
125
Peer reviewed :
Peer Reviewed verified by ORBi
European Projects :
H2020 - 667696 - MEDIT-AGEING - Investigating the impact of meditation training on mental health and wellbeing in the ageing population
Funders :
DMT - Dunhill Medical Trust [GB]
EU - European Union [BE]
Funding number :
667696
Funding text :
The SCD-Well RCT is part of the Medit-Ageing project funded through the European Union in the Horizon 2020 program related to the call PHC22 Promoting Mental Well-Being in the Ageing Population and under grant agreement No. 667696; T.W. was funded by The Dunhill Medical Trust [grant number RTF1806\45]; N.L.M. was supported by a Senior Fellowship from the Alzheimer’s Society (AS-SF-15b-002). The funders had no role in the study design, data acquisition, data analysis, data interpretation, or writing.
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