Article (Scientific journals)
Water-energy nexus in African power pools – The Dispa-SET Africa model
Pavičević, Matija; De Felice, Matteo; Busch, Sebastian et al.
2021In Energy, 228, p. 120623
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Keywords :
African power pools; Dispa-SET; Power dispatch; Water-power nexus; African power pool; Economic profitability; Power; Power pools; Renewable energies; Water energy; Waters resources; Civil and Structural Engineering; Building and Construction; Modeling and Simulation; Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment; Fuel Technology; Energy Engineering and Power Technology; Pollution; Energy (all); Mechanical Engineering; Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering; Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law; Electrical and Electronic Engineering; General Energy
Abstract :
[en] The operation and economic profitability of modern energy systems is constrained by the availability of renewable energy and water resources. Lower water availability due to climate change, higher demand and increased water consumption for non-energy and energy needs may cause problems in Africa. In most African power systems, hydropower is a dominant renewable energy resource, and interconnection capacities are usually limited or unreliable. This paper describes a new modelling framework for analysing the water-energy nexus in the African Power Pools. This framework includes soft linking between two models: the LISFLOOD model is used to generate hydrological inputs and the Dispa-SET model is used for mid-term hydrothermal coordination and optimal unit commitment and power dispatch over the whole African continent. The results show a good agreement between the model outputs and the historical values, despite data-related limitations. Furthermore, the simulations provide hourly time series of electricity generation at the plant level in a robust way. It appears that some African power pools heavily rely on the availability of freshwater resources, while others are less dependent. In the long term, the dependence of the power system on water resources is likely to increase to meet the increasing electricity demand in Africa.
Disciplines :
Energy
Author, co-author :
Pavičević, Matija;  KU Leuven, Faculty of Engineering Technology, Geel, Belgium ; EnergyVille, Genk, Belgium
De Felice, Matteo ;  European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Petten, Netherlands
Busch, Sebastian ;  European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Petten, Netherlands
Hidalgo González, Ignacio;  European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Petten, Netherlands
Quoilin, Sylvain  ;  Université de Liège - ULiège > Aérospatiale et Mécanique (A&M) ; KU Leuven, Faculty of Engineering Technology, Geel, Belgium ; EnergyVille, Genk, Belgium
Language :
English
Title :
Water-energy nexus in African power pools – The Dispa-SET Africa model
Publication date :
August 2021
Journal title :
Energy
ISSN :
0360-5442
eISSN :
1873-6785
Publisher :
Elsevier Ltd
Volume :
228
Pages :
120623
Peer reviewed :
Peer Reviewed verified by ORBi
Funding text :
The electricity demand across all African countries is expected to rise dramatically in the next decades and the entire generation capacity is projected to increase ten-fold by 2065. At the same time consumption of water is expected to increase 7% by 2050 and hydropower, in most African energy systems, will continue to play a very important role, increasing its electricity production from 3 to 5 times in most of the power pools [17]. However, today's energy systems in most of the continent are characterized by their small sizes, the low electrification rates, the high shares of oil in the power generation mix, and the lack of significant power and gas interconnections [18]. Many initiatives such as The United Nation's Sustainable Energy for All [19] and Power Africa [20] focus on the sustainable development of African energy systems. Their aim is to electrify some 60 million homes and support the investment of 30 GW of clean power generation in the near future. Despite this, however, there is no coherent ?by country? and ?by region? set of scenarios besides the ones proposed by Taliotis et al. [21], nor an open energy system analysis platform that may be used to carry out a more detailed investigation of the proposed long term generation expansion scenarios. Furthermore, a review study [22] of the current state of research on the water, energy, and food nexus showed that in Africa only 7% of studies focus on the simultaneous analysis of water-and energy sectors.The resources and services used in this work were provided by the VSC (Flemish Supercomputer Center), funded by the Research Foundation - Flanders (FWO) and the Flemish Government. The views expressed are purely those of the authors and may not in any circumstances be regarded as stating an official position of the European Commission.The resources and services used in this work were provided by the VSC (Flemish Supercomputer Center), funded by the Research Foundation - Flanders ( FWO ) and the Flemish Government .
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