Reference : Sound production in piranhas is associated with modifications of the spinal locomotor...
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Zoology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/259578
Sound production in piranhas is associated with modifications of the spinal locomotor pattern
English
Banse, Marine mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Biologie, Ecologie et Evolution > Morphologie fonctionnelle et évolutive >]
Chagnaud, Boris P. []
Huby, Alessia mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Biologie, Ecologie et Evolution > Morphologie fonctionnelle et évolutive >]
Parmentier, Eric mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Biologie, Ecologie et Evolution > Morphologie fonctionnelle et évolutive >]
Kéver, Loïc []
4-May-2021
Journal of Experimental Biology
The Company of Biologists
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0022-0949
1477-9145
United Kingdom
[en] In piranhas, sounds are produced through the vibration of the swim
bladder wall caused by the contraction of bilateral sonic muscles.
Because they are solely innervated by spinal nerves, these muscles
likely evolved from the locomotor hypaxial musculature. The transition
from a neuromuscular system initially shaped for slow movements
(locomotion) to a system that requires a high contraction rate (sound
production) was accompanied with major peripheral structural
modifications, yet the associated neural adjustments remain to this
date unclear. To close this gap, we investigated the activity of both the
locomotor and the sonic musculature using electromyography. The
comparison between the activation patterns of both systems
highlighted modifications of the neural motor pathway: (1) a
transition from a bilateral alternating pattern to a synchronous
activation pattern, (2) a switch from a slow- to a high-frequency
regime, and (3) an increase in the synchrony of motor neuron
activation. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that sound features
correspond to the activity of the sonic muscles, as both the variation
patterns of periods and amplitudes of sounds highly correspond to
those seen in the sonic muscle electromyograms (EMGsonic).
Assuming that the premotor network for sound production in
piranhas is of spinal origin, our results show that the neural circuit
associated with spinal motor neurons transitioned from the slow
alternating pattern originally used for locomotion to a much faster
simultaneous activation pattern to generate vocal signals.
Freshwater and OCeanic science Unit of reSearch - FOCUS ; Applied and Fundamental FISH Research Center - AFFISH-RC
Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique - F.R.S.-FNRS ; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft - DFG
Researchers ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/259578
10.1242/jeb.242336

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