Article (Scientific journals)
Brain ventricular volume changes induced by long-duration spaceflight
Van Ombergen, Angélique; Jillings, Steven; Jeurissen, Ben et al.
2019In Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 116 (21), p. 10531-10536
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Keywords :
Brain; CSF; Microgravity; Spaceflight; Ventricles
Abstract :
[en] Long-duration spaceflight induces detrimental changes in human physiology. Its residual effects and mechanisms remain unclear. We prospectively investigated the changes in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume of the brain ventricular regions in space crew by means of a region of interest analysis on structural brain scans. Cosmonaut MRI data were investigated preflight (n = 11), postflight (n = 11), and at long-term follow-up 7 mo after landing (n = 7). Post hoc analyses revealed a significant difference between preflight and postflight values for all supratentorial ventricular structures, i.e., lateral ventricle (mean % change ± SE = 13.3 ± 1.9), third ventricle (mean % change ± SE = 10.4 ± 1.1), and the total ventricular volume (mean % change ± SE = 11.6 ± 1.5) (all P < 0.0001), with higher volumes at postflight. At follow-up, these structures did not quite reach baseline levels, with still residual increases in volume for the lateral ventricle (mean % change ± SE = 7.7 ± 1.6; P = 0.0009), the third ventricle (mean % change ± SE = 4.7 ± 1.3; P = 0.0063), and the total ventricular volume (mean % change ± SE = 6.4 ± 1.3; P = 0.0008). This spatiotemporal pattern of CSF compartment enlargement and recovery points to a reduced CSF resorption in microgravity as the underlying cause. Our results warrant more detailed and longer longitudinal follow-up. The clinical impact of our findings on the long-term cosmonauts' health and their relation to ocular changes reported in space travelers requires further prospective studies.
Disciplines :
Neurology
Author, co-author :
Van Ombergen, Angélique;  Lab for Equilibrium Investigations and Aerospace, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, 2610, Belgium, Department of Translational Neurosciences, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, 2610, Belgium
Jillings, Steven ;  Université de Liège - ULiège > GIGA Cousciousness > Coma Science Group
Jeurissen, Ben;  Imec/Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, 2610, Belgium
Tomilovskaya, Elena;  State Science Center of the Russian Federation, Institute of Biomedical Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, 123007, Russian Federation
Rumshiskaya, Alena;  Radiology Department, Federal Center of Treatment and Rehabilitation, Moscow, 125367, Russian Federation
Litvinova, Liudmila;  Radiology Department, Federal Center of Treatment and Rehabilitation, Moscow, 125367, Russian Federation
Nosikova, Inna;  State Science Center of the Russian Federation, Institute of Biomedical Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, 123007, Russian Federation
Pechenkova, Ekaterina;  Laboratory for Cognitive Research, National Research University, Higher School of Economics, Moscow, 101000, Russian Federation
Rukavishnikov, Ilya;  State Science Center of the Russian Federation, Institute of Biomedical Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, 123007, Russian Federation
Manko, Olga;  State Science Center of the Russian Federation, Institute of Biomedical Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, 123007, Russian Federation
Danylichev, Sergey;  Gagarin Cosmonauts Training Center, Star City, 141160, Russian Federation
Rühl, R. Maxine;  Department of Neurology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Munich, 81377, Germany
Kozlovskaya, Inessa B.;  State Science Center of the Russian Federation, Institute of Biomedical Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, 123007, Russian Federation
Sunaert, Stefan;  Translational MRI, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, 3000, Belgium
Parizel, Paul M.;  Radiology Department, Antwerp University Hospital, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, 2650, Belgium
Sinitsyn, Valentin;  Faculty of Fundamental Medicine, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, 119991, Russian Federation
Laureys, Steven  ;  Université de Liège - ULiège > Consciousness-Coma Science Group
Sijbers, Paul;  Imec/Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, 2610, Belgium
Eulenburg, Peter Z.;  Department of Neurology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Munich, 81377, Germany
Wuyts, Floris L.;  Lab for Equilibrium Investigations and Aerospace, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, 2610, Belgium
More authors (10 more) Less
Language :
English
Title :
Brain ventricular volume changes induced by long-duration spaceflight
Publication date :
2019
Journal title :
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
ISSN :
0027-8424
eISSN :
1091-6490
Publisher :
National Academy of Sciences, Washington DC, United States - District of Columbia
Volume :
116
Issue :
21
Pages :
10531-10536
Peer reviewed :
Peer Reviewed verified by ORBi
Funders :
ASE - Agence Spatiale Européenne [FR]
RAS - Russian Academy of Sciences [RU]
F.R.S.-FNRS - Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique [BE]
RNF - Rossijskij naučnyj fond [RU]
European Society of Anaesthesiology
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