Reference : Social influence on the expression of robbing and bartering behaviours in Balinese lo...
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Zoology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/242081
Social influence on the expression of robbing and bartering behaviours in Balinese long‑tailed macaques
English
Brotcorne, Fany mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Biologie, Ecologie et Evolution > Biologie du comportement - Ethologie et psychologie animale >]
Holzner, Anna [Universiti Sains Malaysia > School of Biological Sciences > > >]
Jorge‑Sales, Lucía [Miku Conservación AC México > Primate Conservation and Sustainable Development > > >]
Gunst, Noëlle [University of Lethbridge, Canada > Department of Psychology > > >]
Hambuckers, Alain mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Biologie, Ecologie et Evolution > Biologie du comportement - Ethologie et psychologie animale >]
Wandia, Nengah [Udayana University > Faculty of Veterinary Medicine > > >]
Leca, Jean-Baptiste [University of Lethbridge > Department of Psychology > > >]
9-Dec-2019
Animal Cognition
Springer
23
2
311-326
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
1435-9448
1435-9456
Germany
[en] Social learning ; response facilitation ; Behavioural contagion ; Model-based biases ; Material culture ; Token exchange
[en] Animals use social information, available from conspecifics, to learn and express novel and adaptive behaviours. Amongst social learning mechanisms, response facilitation occurs when observing a demonstrator performing a behaviour temporarily increases the probability that the observer will perform the same behaviour shortly after. We studied “robbing and bartering” (RB), two behaviours routinely displayed by free-ranging long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) at Uluwatu Temple, Bali, Indonesia. When robbing, a monkey steals an inedible object from a visitor and may use this object as a token by exchanging it for food with the temple staff (bartering). We tested whether the expression of RB-related behaviours could be explained by response facilitation and was influenced by model-based biases (i.e. dominance rank, age, experience and success of the demonstrator). We compared video-recorded focal samples of 44 witness individuals (WF) immediately after they observed an RB-related event performed by group members, and matched-control focal samples (MCF) of the same focal subjects, located at similar distance from former demonstrators (N = 43 subjects), but in the absence of any RB-related demonstrations. We found that the synchronized expression of robbing and bartering could be explained by response facilitation. Both behaviours occurred significantly more often during WF than during MCF. Following a contagion-like effect, the rate of robbing behaviour displayed by the witness increased with the cumulative rate of robbing behaviour performed by demonstrators, but this effect was not found for the bartering behaviour. The expression of RB was not influenced by model-based biases. Our results support the cultural nature of the RB practice in the Uluwatu macaques.
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students ; General public
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/242081
10.1007/s10071-019-01335-5
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10071-019-01335-5

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