Reference : When pigtailed macaques cannot select for optimal sleeping sites in degraded habitat
Scientific congresses and symposiums : Unpublished conference/Abstract
Life sciences : Environmental sciences & ecology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/240441
When pigtailed macaques cannot select for optimal sleeping sites in degraded habitat
English
[fr] Lorsque que les macaques à queue de cochon ne peuvent pas choisir des sites dortoirs optimaux dans un habitat dégradé
Gazagne, Eva mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > > > Form. doct. sc. (biol. orga. & écol. - paysage)]
Savini, Tommaso [King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi (Bangkok) > Conservation Ecology Program > > >]
Ngoprasert, Dusit [King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi (Bangkok) > Conservation Ecology Program > > >]
Huynen, Marie-Claude mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Biologie, Ecologie et Evolution > Biologie du comportement - Ethologie et psychologie animale >]
Brotcorne, Fany mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Biologie, Ecologie et Evolution > Biologie du comportement - Ethologie et psychologie animale >]
10-Oct-2019
No
No
International
The Annual Meeting of the Belgian Group for Primatology
10 Octobre 2019
Université de Liège
Liège
Belgique
[en] Habitat degradation ; sleeping site selection ; predation avoidance ; food resources ; Macaca leonina
[en] Primates spend half of their lives in sleeping sites and should select them carefully to maximize fitness. Sleeping site selection in degraded habitat, with reduced availability and quality of resources, is therefore likely to play a leading role in primates’ survival. We aimed to assess the impact of habitat degradation on sleeping site selection patterns in a troop of northern pigtailed macaques, using 3 non-mutually exclusive hypotheses: null hypothesis of random selection, predation avoidance, and food proximity. We identified 107 sleeping sites with only 15 reused sites selected at random in the Sakaerat Biosphere Reserve, northeastern Thailand. After analyzing forest structure at sleeping sites and random sites, we found a general low availability of large and tall trees. Our results show that macaques did not select sleeping sites at random; probability of site selection increased in familiar areas with a high number of stems and with emergent trees. Following the predator avoidance hypothesis, these characteristics are likely to facilitate macaques escape in case of predator attack and also to decrease predator detection at their sleeping sites. Additionally, the food proximity hypothesis seems to be the leading strategy in explaining sleeping sites selection of this degraded habitat. Macaques multiplied their sleeping sites following food distribution, and slept inside or in close proximity to their feeding area, which is likely to maximize their energy intake. Our results highlight the impact habitat degradation may have on sleeping site selection in a flexible species.
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/240441

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