Reference : Increased sea ice cover alters food web structure in East Antarctica
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Zoology
Life sciences : Aquatic sciences & oceanology
Life sciences : Environmental sciences & ecology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/236151
Increased sea ice cover alters food web structure in East Antarctica
English
Michel, Loïc mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Biologie, Ecologie et Evolution > Océanographie biologique >]
Danis, Bruno []
Dubois, Philippe []
Eleaume, Marc []
Fournier, Jérôme []
Gallut, Cyril []
Jane, Philip []
Lepoint, Gilles mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Biologie, Ecologie et Evolution > Océanographie biologique >]
30-May-2019
Scientific Reports
Nature Publishing Group
9
8062
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
2045-2322
London
United Kingdom
[en] stable isotopes ; food webs ; antarctica ; global change ; sea ice ; southern ocean
[en] In recent years, sea ice cover along coasts of East Antarctica has tended to increase. To understand ecological implications of these environmental changes, we studied benthic food web structure on the coasts of Adélie Land during an event of unusually high sea ice cover (i.e. two successive austral summers without seasonal breakup). We used integrative trophic markers (stable isotope ratios of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur) to build ecological models and explored feeding habits of macroinvertebrates. In total, 28 taxa spanning most present animal groups and functional guilds were investigated. Our results indicate that the absence of seasonal sea ice breakup deeply influenced benthic food webs. Sympagic algae dominated the diet of many key consumers, and the trophic levels of invertebrates were low, suggesting omnivore consumers did not rely much on predation and/or scavenging. Our results provide insights about how Antarctic benthic consumers, which typically live in an extremely stable environment, might adapt their feeding habits in response to sudden changes in environmental conditions and trophic resource availability. They also show that local and/or global trends of sea ice increase in Antarctica have the potential to cause drastic changes in food web structure, and therefore to impact benthic communities.
Centre Interfacultaire de Recherches en Océanologie - MARE ; Freshwater and OCeanic science Unit of reSearch - FOCUS
Politique Scientifique Fédérale (Belgique) = Belgian Federal Science Policy ; Fédération Wallonie Bruxelles. Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique - F.R.S.-FNRS ; French Polar Institute Paul-Emile Victor (IPEV)
vERSO - Ecosystem Responses to global change: a multiscale approach in the Southern Ocean (BR/132/A1/vERSO)
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/236151
10.1038/s41598-019-44605-5
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-44605-5

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