Reference : Assessment of thermal overheating in free-running buildings in Cairo
Scientific congresses and symposiums : Paper published in a book
Engineering, computing & technology : Architecture
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/234286
Assessment of thermal overheating in free-running buildings in Cairo
English
Attia, Shady mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département ArGEnCo > Techniques de construction des bâtiments >]
Mustafa, Ahmed Mohamed El Saeid [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département ArGEnCo > LEMA (Local environment management and analysis) >]
Singh, Manoj Kumar []
10-Apr-2019
PROCEEDINGS OF THE 1ST INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON COMFORT AT THE EXTREMES: ENERGY, ECONOMY AND CLIMATE
Finlayson, Will
Roaf, Susan
Ecohouse Initative Ltd.
902-913
Yes
Yes
International
Dubai
UAE
Comfort at the extremes 2019
09-10 April 2019
Susan Roaf and Will Finlayson
Dubai
UAE
[en] city climate ; heat wave ; thermal comfort ; heat stress ; behavioural adaptation
[en] Assessing human health under climate change in hot climates is of particular importance in the
Middle East. Cairo is one of those cities that have an estimated 2018 population as high as 13 million, with a metropolitan population of 21 million, which makes it the largest city in Africa and the Middle East. In and around Cairo, many of the summer seasonal deaths are blamed on human discomfort due to anthropogenic climate change. High urban population density, urban heat island effect, cramped living conditions including housing, schools and prisons are all reasons to the increase of heat-related health problems in Cairo. Therefore, this initial study investigates and maps overheating in free-running residential buildings in Cairo. The study follows a combined, monitoring and observational assessment of the 2015 heat wave (19-day event)
in Egypt. Using surface urban heat island maps, representative urban areas were determined and field measurements were carried out to assess indoor air temperatures and relative humidity. This was followed by observational field visits and interaction with local citizens to document the impacts and adaptation measures corresponding to overheating. The paper provides insights on indoor human discomfort with a focus on physical and non-physical heat stress reasons during climate extremes. The study provides initial insights on thermal comfort that can prompt local professionals and governments to address overheating and thermal stress in free-running residential buildings.
Sustainable Building Design Lab
Researchers ; Professionals ; General public
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/234286
https://windsorconference.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/CATE2019_Proceedings.pdf

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