Reference : Sol-gel syntheses of photocatalysts for the removal of pharmaceutical products in water
Scientific journals : Article
Engineering, computing & technology : Chemical engineering
Engineering, computing & technology : Materials science & engineering
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/231670
Sol-gel syntheses of photocatalysts for the removal of pharmaceutical products in water
English
Belet, Artium mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Department of Chemical Engineering > Génie chimique - Nanomatériaux et interfaces >]
Wolfs, Cédric mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Department of Chemical Engineering > Génie chimique - Nanomatériaux et interfaces >]
Mahy, Julien mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Department of Chemical Engineering > Department of Chemical Engineering >]
Poelman, Dirk [> >]
Vreuls, Christelle [Université de Liège - ULiège > Department of Chemical Engineering > Department of Chemical Engineering >]
Gillard, Nathalie [> >]
Lambert, Stéphanie mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Department of Chemical Engineering > Department of Chemical Engineering >]
20-Jan-2019
Nanomaterials
MDPI AG
9
126
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
2079-4991
Basel
Switzerland
[en] TiO2 ; photocatalysis ; sol-gel process ; thin films ; pharmaceutical products
[en] A screening study on seven photocatalysts was performed to identify the best candidate for pharmaceutical products degradation in water. Photocatalysts were deposited as thin films through a sol-gel process and subsequent dip-coating on glass slides. The efficiency of each photocatalyst was assessed through the degradation of methylene blue first, and then, through the degradation of fifteen different pharmaceutical products. Two main types of synthesis methods were considered: aqueous syntheses, where the reaction takes place in water, and organic syntheses, where reactions take place in an organic solvent and only a stoichiometric amount of water is added to the reaction medium. Photocatalysts synthesized via aqueous sol-gel routes showed relatively lower degradation efficiencies; however, the organic route required a calcination step at high temperature to form the photoactive crystalline phase, while the aqueous route did not. The best performances for the degradation of pharmaceuticals arose when Evonik P25 and silver nanoparticles were added to TiO2, which was synthesized using an organic solvent. In the case of methylene blue degradation, TiO2 modified with Evonik P25 and TiO2 doped with MnO2 nanoparticles were the two best candidates.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/231670
10.3390/nano9010126

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