Reference : Effects of drought legacy and tree species admixing on bacterial growth and respirati...
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Phytobiology (plant sciences, forestry, mycology...)
Life sciences : Environmental sciences & ecology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/228234
Effects of drought legacy and tree species admixing on bacterial growth and respiration in a young forest soil upon drying and rewetting
English
Rahman, Md Masudur mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Biologie, Ecologie et Evolution > Ecologie végétale et microbienne >]
Hicks, Lettice C. [> >]
Verheyen, Kris [> >]
Rousk, Johannes [> >]
Carnol, Monique mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Biologie, Ecologie et Evolution > Ecologie végétale et microbienne >]
2018
Soil Biology and Biochemistry
127
148 - 155
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0038-0717
[en] Precipitation manipulation ; Tree species richness ; Sapling ; Bacterial growth ; Leucine incorporation ; Birch effect
[en] In the context of future climate change, the flush of CO2 emissions from soils after drying-rewetting events could have a strong impact on the terrestrial carbon balance. Mixed forests may be more resistant and resilient to drought events compared to monocultures, and as such may modulate the effects of drought on soil functioning belowground. We investigated the influence of mixed planting and drought legacy on respiration and bacterial growth rates (3H Leucine incorporation) in response to drying-rewetting. Soils were sampled from a 7-year old tree diversity experiment (FORBIO), where oak (Quercus robur L.) trees admixed with one or three other tree species were subjected to ∼50% precipitation reduction for 2 years (“drought legacy”). Respiration increased immediately after rewetting, whereas bacterial growth only started after a distinct lag phase of ca. 7 h. A legacy of drought reduced bacterial growth and respiration rates upon rewetting, however tree species admixing did not modulate the drought legacy effect. Our results suggest that prolonged decrease in precipitation may lead to a reduced CO2 pulse upon drying-rewetting and admixing up to three tree species with oak in a young afforestation would not alleviate drought legacy effects on bacterial growth and respiration rates.
Politique Scientifique Fédérale (Belgique) = Belgian Federal Science Policy
FORBIO Climate- Adaptation potential of biodiverse forests in the face of climate change
Researchers ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/228234
10.1016/j.soilbio.2018.09.026
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0038071718303377

File(s) associated to this reference

Fulltext file(s):

FileCommentaryVersionSizeAccess
Restricted access
Rahman et al. - 2018 - Effect of drought legacy and tree species admixing on bacterial growth and soil respiration rates upon drying-rew.pdfPublisher postprint726.31 kBRequest copy

Additional material(s):

File Commentary Size Access
Restricted access
Rahman et al. - 2018 - Effect of drought legacy and tree species admixing on bacterial growth and soil respiration rates upon drying-re.docxSupplementary data1.87 MBRequest copy

Bookmark and Share SFX Query

All documents in ORBi are protected by a user license.