Reference : Fatigue‐related risk management in the emergency department: a focus‐group study
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Social, industrial & organizational psychology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/224109
Fatigue‐related risk management in the emergency department: a focus‐group study
English
Berastegui, Pierre mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Psychologie > Ergonomie et intervention au travail >]
Jaspar, Mathieu mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Psychologie > Ergonomie et intervention au travail >]
GHUYSEN, Alexandre mailto [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liège - CHU > > Service des urgences >]
Nyssen, Anne-Sophie mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de Psychologie > Ergonomie et intervention au travail >]
6-May-2018
Internal and Emergency Medicine
CEPI-AIM Group
Yes (verified by ORBi)
1828-0447
Italy
[en] Risk management ; Fatigue proofing strategies ; Emergency service
[en] Fatigue has major implications on both patient safety and healthcare practitioner’s well-being. Traditionally, two approaches can be used to reduce fatigue-related risk: reducing the likelihood of a fatigued operator working (i.e. fatigue reduction), or reducing the likelihood that a fatigued operator will make an error (i.e. fatigue proofing). Recent progress mainly focussed on fatigue reduction strategies such as reducing work hours. Yet it has to be recognized that such approach has not wholly overcome the experience of fatigue. Our purpose is to investigate individual proofing and reduction strategies used by emergency physicians to manage fatigue-related risk. 25 emergency physicians were recruited for the study. Four focus groups were formed which consisted of an average of six individuals. Qualitative data were collected using a semi-structured discussion guide unfolding in two parts. First, the participants were asked to describe how on-the-job fatigue a ected their e ciency at work. A mind map was progressively drawn based upon the participants’ perceived effects of fatigue. Second, participants were asked to describe any strategies they personally used to cope with these effects. We used inductive qualitative content analysis to reveal content themes for both fatigue effects and strategies. Emergency physicians reported 28 fatigue effects, 12 reduction strategies and 21 proofing strategies. Content analysis yielded a further classification of proofing strategies into self-regulation, task re-allocation and error monitoring strategies. There is significant potential for the development of more formal processes based on physicians’ informal strategies.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/224109
10.1007/s11739-018-1873-3

File(s) associated to this reference

Fulltext file(s):

FileCommentaryVersionSizeAccess
Open access
doi.org:10.1007:s11739-018-1873-3.pdfPublisher postprint1.07 MBView/Open

Bookmark and Share SFX Query

All documents in ORBi are protected by a user license.