Reference : Predicting the most appropriate wood Open Access Biotechnology for Biofuels biomass f...
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Biotechnology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/223096
Predicting the most appropriate wood Open Access Biotechnology for Biofuels biomass for selected industrial applications: comparison of wood, pulping, and enzymatic treatments using fluorescent-tagged carbohydrate-binding modules
English
Bombeck, Pierre-Louis mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > > > Doct. sc. agro. & ingé. biol. (Paysage)]
Khatri, Vinay [Université du Québec à Trois‐Rivières, Centre de Recherche sur les Matériaux Lignocellulosiques, C.P. 500, Trois‐Rivières, QC G9A 5H7, Canada. / PROTEO, Université Laval, Québec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada > > > >]
Meddeb‐Mouelhi, Fatma [Université du Québec à Trois‐Rivières, Centre de Recherche sur les Matériaux Lignocellulosiques, C.P. 500, Trois‐Rivières, QC G9A 5H7, Canada. / PROTEO, Université Laval, Québec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada. > > > >]
Montplaisir, Daniel [Département de Chimie, Biochimie et Physique, Université du Québec à Trois‐Rivières, C.P. 500, Trois‐Rivières, QC G9A 5H7, Canada. > > > >]
Richel, Aurore mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Agronomie, Bio-ingénierie et Chimie (AgroBioChem) > SMARTECH >]
Beauregard, Marc [Université du Québec à Trois‐Rivières, Centre de Recherche sur les Matériaux Lignocellulosiques, C.P. 500, Trois‐Rivières, QC G9A 5H7, Canada. / PROTEO, Université Laval, Québec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada. > > > >]
2017
Biotechnology for Biofuels
BioMed Central
10
293
Yes (verified by ORBi)
1754-6834
United Kingdom
[en] FTCM ; Carbohydrate-binding module ; Fluorescent protein ; LCB (lignocellulosic biomass) ; Cellulose ; Hemicellulose ; Enzymes
[en] Background: Lignocellulosic biomass will progressively become the main source of carbon for a number of prod‐ ucts as the Earth’s oil reservoirs disappear. Technology for conversion of wood fiber into bioproducts (wood biorefin‐ ing) continues to flourish, and access to reliable methods for monitoring modification of such fibers is becoming an important issue. Recently, we developed a simple, rapid approach for detecting four different types of polymer on the surface of wood fibers. Named fluorescent‐tagged carbohydrate‐binding module (FTCM), this method is based on the fluorescence signal from carbohydrate‐binding modules‐based probes designed to recognize specific polymers such as crystalline cellulose, amorphous cellulose, xylan, and mannan.
Results: Here we used FTCM to characterize pulps made from softwood and hardwood that were prepared using Kraft or chemical‐thermo‐mechanical pulping. Comparison of chemical analysis (NREL protocol) and FTCM revealed that FTCM results were consistent with chemical analysis of the hemicellulose composition of both hardwood and softwood samples. Kraft pulping increased the difference between softwood and hardwood surface mannans, and increased xylan exposure. This suggests that Kraft pulping leads to exposure of xylan after removal of both lignin
and mannan. Impact of enzyme cocktails from Trichoderma reesei (Celluclast 1.5L) and from Aspergillus sp. (Carezyme 1000L) was investigated by analysis of hydrolyzed sugars and by FTCM. Both enzymes preparations released cel‐ lobiose and glucose from pulps, with the cocktail from Trichoderma being the most efficient. Enzymatic treatments were not as effective at converting chemical‐thermomechanical pulps to simple sugars, regardless of wood type. FTCM revealed that amorphous cellulose was the primary target of either enzyme preparation, which resulted in a higher proportion of crystalline cellulose on the surface after enzymatic treatment. FTCM confirmed that enzymes from Aspergillus had little impact on exposed hemicelluloses, but that enzymes from the more aggressive Trichoderma cocktail reduced hemicelluloses at the surface.
Conclusions: Overall, this study indicates that treatment with enzymes from Trichoderma is appropriate for gen‐ erating crystalline cellulose at fiber surface. Applications such as nanocellulose or composites requiring chemical resistance would benefit from this enzymatic treatment. The milder enzyme mixture from Aspergillus allowed for removal of amorphous cellulose while preserving hemicelluloses at fiber surface, which makes this treatment appro‐ priate for new paper products where surface chemical responsiveness is required.
This work was supported by Wallonie‐Bruxelles International through the WBI World program and by grants awarded by the Consortium de recherche et innovations en bioprocédés industriels au Québec (CRIBIQ) and Kruger inc.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/223096
10.1186/s13068-017-0980-0

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