Reference : Dissociation between the locomotor and anxiolytic effects of acetaldehyde in the elev...
Scientific journals : Article
Human health sciences : Pharmacy, pharmacology & toxicology
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Neurosciences & behavior
Human health sciences : Psychiatry
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/2221
Dissociation between the locomotor and anxiolytic effects of acetaldehyde in the elevated plus-maze : evidence that acetaldehyde is not involved in the anxiolytic effects of ethanol in mice
English
Tambour, Sophie [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département des sciences cognitives > Neuroscience comportementale et psychopharmacologie expér. >]
Didone, Vincent mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département des sciences cognitives > Psychologie quantitative >]
Tirelli, Ezio mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département des sciences cognitives > Neuroscience comportementale et psychopharmacologie expér. >]
Quertemont, Etienne mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département des sciences cognitives > Psychologie quantitative >]
2005
European Neuropsychopharmacology
Elsevier Science
15
6
655-662
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0924-977X
Amsterdam
The Netherlands
[en] ethanol ; acetaldehyde ; cyanamide ; elevated plus-maze ; anxiolysis
[fr] alcoolisme ; animal ; comportement animal ; modèle animal ; psychopharmacologie
[en] Acetaldehyde, the first product of ethanol metabolism, has been suggested to play a major role in many behavioral effects of ethanol. However, very few studies have directly tested the behavioral effects of the acute administration of acetaldehyde. In particular, the role of this metabolite in ethanol-induced anxiolytic effects has never been extensively tested. The aim of the present study was to characterize the anxiolytic effects of acetaldehyde in two strains of mice, C57BL/6J and CD1 mice with the elevated plus-maze procedure. The results show that acute injections of ethanol (1-2 g/kg) induced significant dose-dependent anxiolytic effects in both strains of mice. In contrast, acetaldehyde failed to produce any anxiolytic effect, although it induced a significant hypolocomotor effect at the highest doses. In an independent experiment, cyanamide, an aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor, prevented the locomotor stimulant effects of ethanol, although it failed to alter its anxiolytic effects. Together, the results of the present study indicate that acetaidehyde is not involved in ethanol-induced anxiolytic effects, although it may be involved in its sedative/hypolocomotor effects. (c) 2005 Elsevier BX and ECNP. All fights reserved.
Centre de Neurosciences Cognitives et Cmoportementales
Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique (Communauté française de Belgique) - F.R.S.-FNRS
Researchers ; Professionals
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/2221
10.1016/j.euroneuro.2005.04.014

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