Reference : Neural bases of subsequent forgetting in young and older adults
Scientific congresses and symposiums : Poster
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Theoretical & cognitive psychology
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Neurosciences & behavior
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/201330
Neural bases of subsequent forgetting in young and older adults
English
[fr] Bases neuronales de l'oubli ultérieur chez des adultes jeunes et âgés
François, Sarah mailto [Université de Liège > Département de Psychologie > Neuropsychologie >]
Angel, Lucie [Université François Rabelais de Tours > Département de Psychologie > > >]
Salmon, Eric mailto [Université de Liège > Département des sciences cliniques > Neuroimagerie des troubles de la mémoire et révalid. cogn. >]
Bastin, Christine mailto [Université de Liège > Département des sciences cliniques > Neuroimagerie des troubles de la mémoire et révalid. cogn. >]
Collette, Fabienne mailto [Université de Liège > Département de Psychologie > Neuropsychologie >]
17-Mar-2016
Yes
International
Joint meeting of the BNS/SNLF
Du 17 au 18 mars 2016
[en] Episodic memory ; Ageing ; fMRI ; Forgetting
[fr] Mémoire épisodique ; Vieillissement ; IRMF
[en] Oubli
[en] Objectives
Using functional MRI, we looked into the age-related difference in the neural underpinnings of
subsequent forgetting - cerebral activation at encoding for items that are later forgotten.
Methods
In an MRI scanner, during an incidental encoding phase, participants (20 young and 19 older
adults) were presented with black-and-white drawings of objects. They were instructed to
perform a size judgement on the depicted objects. Then, still in the scanner, the volunteers'
memory for the objects was tested by showing them pictures shown previously along with new
ones and asking them to make a Remember/Know/New judgement.
Results
Behaviourally, older participants showed decreased recollection, but intact familiarity at
recognition. In an event-related design (SPM8), we compared cerebral areas activated at
encoding for items subsequently forgotten compared to those leading to recollection (p<.001
uncorrected). In both groups, a pattern of activation consistent with the default-mode network
(DMN) was found. Furthermore, results pointed out to additional activations in the frontoparietal
control network in older adults. Also, contrasting activations for items subsequently
forgotten with those leading to familiarity revealed activations in DMN areas. In young adults,
these activations were limited to the posterior cingulate cortex.
Conclusions
The forgetting of information appears to be associated with a higher recruitment of the DMN,
which might reflect disengagement from encoding-supportive processes, both in young and
older participants. Moreover, the additional fronto-parietal activity found in the older group
could indicate that their failure to recollect the pictures was related to inefficient encoding
mechanisms, in addition to disengagement from the task.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/201330

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