Reference : Diaspore heteromorphism in the invasive Bromus tectorum L. (Poaceae): sterile fl oret...
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Environmental sciences & ecology
Life sciences : Phytobiology (plant sciences, forestry, mycology...)
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/200715
Diaspore heteromorphism in the invasive Bromus tectorum L. (Poaceae): sterile fl orets increase dispersal propensity and distance
English
Monty, Arnaud mailto [Université de Liège > Ingénierie des biosystèmes (Biose) > Biodiversité et Paysage >]
Maebe, Laura mailto [Université de Liège > Ingénierie des biosystèmes (Biose) > Biodiversité et Paysage >]
Mahy, Grégory mailto [Université de Liège > Ingénierie des biosystèmes (Biose) > Biodiversité et Paysage >]
Brown, Cynthia S. []
23-Jun-2016
Flora
Elsevier GmbH, Urban & Fischer Verlag
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0367-2530
[en] Anemochory ; epizoochory ; seed dimorphism ; downy brome ; dispersal ecology ; cheatgrass
[en] Within a species, the distance travelled by a particular diaspore depends on its morphology. In Poaceae, the presence of terminal sterile florets can lead to diaspore heteromorphism, which may influence dispersal. We tested the hypothesis that the presence of sterile florets favored dispersal in Bromus tectorum L., an invasive grass in the Western US.
We used field and controlled experiments to study the dispersal of caryopses with and without sterile florets attached (respectively complex and simple diaspores), as well as pieces of inflorescence that detached from the mother plants. We considered both primary and secondary dispersal, as well as abiotic and biotic dispersal agents. The distance travelled by the diaspores and their attachment to animal fur were related to the presence and number of sterile florets.
Abiotic agents moved diaspores over relatively short distances, both in terms of primary and secondary dispersal. A significant proportion of diaspores attached to fur, suggesting a potential for dispersal over longdistances. Complex diaspores were better dispersers than simple ones (and pieces of inflorescence), and this pattern was consistent across the study. However, among complex diaspores, the number of sterile florets had little or no influence.
Considering primary and secondary dispersal by abiotic and biotic agents provided a general picture of the dispersal ecology of B. tectorum. For all the dispersal steps and dispersal agents we studied, the presence of sterile florets favored dispersal. These results highlight the functional significance of diaspore heteromorphism induced by floret sterility in the dispersal of Poaceae.
Researchers ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/200715
10.1016/j.flora.2016.06.004

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