Reference : Models of the η Corvi Debris Disk from the Keck Interferometer, Spitzer, and Herschel
Scientific journals : Article
Physical, chemical, mathematical & earth Sciences : Space science, astronomy & astrophysics
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/197422
Models of the η Corvi Debris Disk from the Keck Interferometer, Spitzer, and Herschel
English
Lebreton, J. mailto [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA; NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology, 770 S. Wilson Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA;]
Beichman, C. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA; NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology, 770 S. Wilson Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA; Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91107, USA]
Bryden, G. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91107, USA]
Defrere, Denis mailto [Université de Liège > Département d'astrophys., géophysique et océanographie (AGO) > Astroph. extragalactique et observations spatiales (AEOS) >]
Mennesson, B. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91107, USA]
Millan-Gabet, R. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA; NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology, 770 S. Wilson Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA]
Boccaletti, A. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, University Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6 and University Denis Diderot Paris 7, 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon, France)]
1-Feb-2016
Astrophysical Journal
817
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0004-637X
1538-4357
[en] circumstellar matter ; infrared: planetary systems ; planetary systems ; stars: individual: Corvi ; HD 109085 ; zodiacal dust
[en] Debris disks are signposts of analogs to small-body populations of the solar system, often, however, with much higher masses and dust production rates. The disk associated with the nearby star η Crv is especially striking, as it shows strong mid- and far-infrared excesses despite an age of ∼1.4 Gyr. We undertake constructing a consistent model of the system that can explain a diverse collection of spatial and spectral data. We analyze Keck Interferometer Nuller measurements and revisit Spitzer and additional spectrophotometric data, as well as resolved Herschel images, to determine the dust spatial distribution in the inner exozodi and in the outer belt. We model in detail the two-component disk and the dust properties from the sub-AU scale to the outermost regions by fitting simultaneously all measurements against a large parameter space. The properties of the cold belt are consistent with a collisional cascade in a reservoir of ice-free planetesimals at 133 AU. It shows marginal evidence for asymmetries along the major axis. KIN enables us to establish that the warm dust consists of a ring that peaks between 0.2 and 0.8 AU. To reconcile this location with the ∼400 K dust temperature, very high albedo dust must be invoked, and a distribution of forsterite grains starting from micron sizes satisfies this criterion, while providing an excellent fit to the spectrum. We discuss additional constraints from the LBTI and near-infrared spectra, and we present predictions of what James Webb Space Telescope can unveil about this unusual object and whether it can detect unseen planets.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/197422
10.3847/0004-637X/817/2/165
http://esoads.eso.org/abs/2016ApJ...817..165L

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