Reference : Hydrocarbon biostimulation and bioaugmentation in organic carbon and clay-rich soils
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Microbiology
Physical, chemical, mathematical & earth Sciences : Multidisciplinary, general & others
Life sciences : Environmental sciences & ecology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/196531
Hydrocarbon biostimulation and bioaugmentation in organic carbon and clay-rich soils
English
Masy, Thibaut mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > > > Doct. sc. agro. & ingé. biol.]
Demanèche, Sandrine [Université de Lyon - Ecole Centrale de Lyon > Laboratoire Ampère - UMR CNRS 5005 > Groupe de Génomique Microbienne Environnementale > >]
Tromme, Olivier [Sanifox SPRL > > > >]
Thonart, Philippe mailto [Université de Liège > Agronomie, Bio-ingénierie et Chimie (AgroBioChem) > Bio-industries >]
Jacques, Philippe mailto [Université de Liège > Agronomie, Bio-ingénierie et Chimie (AgroBioChem) > Bio-industries >]
Hiligsmann, Serge mailto [Université de Liège > Agronomie, Bio-ingénierie et Chimie (AgroBioChem) > Bio-industries >]
Vogel, Timothy M. [Université de Lyon - Ecole Centrale de Lyon > Laboratoire Ampère - UMR CNRS 5005 > Groupe de Génomique Microbienne Environnementale > >]
Aug-2016
Soil Biology and Biochemistry
Elsevier
99
66-74
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0038-0717
1879-3428
[en] Bioremediation ; Rhodococcus erythropolis ; Hydrocarbons ; Oxitop ; qPCR ; 16S-rRNA gene sequencing
[en] Hydrocarbon-contaminated organic carbon-rich clayey soils are challenging for bioremediation stakeholders since the pollutant is heterogeneously distributed and poorly bioavailable due to its strong adsorption on clay and organic particles. In addition, biodegradation rates are restricted by limited diffusion of oxygen and nutrients to hydrocarbon-degrading aerobes. This study assessed the benefits of bioaugmentation with the strain Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 versus those from biostimulation and anaerobic natural attenuation in terms of hydrocarbon (HC) degradation efficiency and changes in the bacterial community structure in a diesel-polluted clay-rich soil. Three soil samples with a similar total organic content but with a different HC concentration (0.2, 1.0 and 6.5 g/kg) were compared in a microcosm experiment. Despite a limitation in oxygen transfer, R. erythropolis T902.1 enhanced a greater HC degradation compared to the biostimulation treatment. However, this advantage decreased with time as the proportion of Rhodococci declined from 25% initially to 1% of the global community after 80 days of treatment. Similarly, the alkB gene proportion in bioaugmented soils decreased to levels close to those of biostimulated soils. Consequently, further engineering was suggested to improve the resilience of the inoculum to ensure its long-term presence and activity in such polluted environments.
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/196531
10.1016/j.soilbio.2016.04.016

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