Reference : Did the savannah « flourished » 3000 years ago in the so-called Sangha River Interval...
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http://hdl.handle.net/2268/195447
Did the savannah « flourished » 3000 years ago in the so-called Sangha River Interval of the Guineo-Congolian rainforest ? A retrospective study using stable isotopes and phytoliths
English
Bentaleb, Ilham [ISEM Montpellier > > > >]
Freycon, Vincent [CIRAD > > > >]
Gillet, Jean-François [Nature Forest Environment > > > >]
Oslisly, Richard [IRD > > > >]
Bremond, Laurent [EPHE > > > >]
Favier, Charly [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - CNRS > > > >]
Fontugne, Michel [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - CNRS > > > >]
Droissart, Vincent []
Gourlet-Fleury, Sylvie [CIRAD > > > >]
Guillou, Gaël []
Martin, Céline []
Morin, Julie mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > > > Form. doct. sc. agro. & ingé. biol.]
Ngomanda, Alfred []
de Saulieu, Geoffroy []
Sebag, David []
Subitani, Sandrine [EPHE > > > >]
Wonkam, Christelle [ISEM Montpellier > > > >]
Ngeutchoua, Gabriel []
Apr-2015
A0
No
No
International
European Geosciences Union (EGU) General Assembly 2015
27 April - 2 May 2015
EGU
Vienna
Austria
[en] archaeology ; paleoenvironment ; central Africa ; Congo Basin ; phytoliths ; radiocarbon ; 13C ; carbon 13 ; savannah ; Sangha River Interval ; Cameroon ; Republic of the Congo ; tropical forests ; tropical Africa ; Central African Republic
[en] We aim to improve our knowledge of the dynamic of the vegetation in Central Africa during the last 5 kyrs and to discuss the main hypothesis described in the literature - humans versus climatic impacts- both suggested as responsible of the Congo basin rainforest decline observed between 3 and 2.5 kyrs. We use the carbon isotopic composition of well-dated Central African soils to reconstruct the dynamic of the vegetation cover. We will discuss the carbon isotopic composition of the soil organic carbon methodology for reconstructing palaeovegetation in the light of Rayleigh distillation model. We showed that numerous sites exhibit a carbon isotopic ratios reflecting the Rayleigh distillation but few sites recorded real vegetation changes. Our study suggests that the vegetation of the Guineo-Congolian Region was disturbed between 3000 and 2000 BP (Before Present) without an extreme savannah expansion. We discussed the two hypotheses human versus climate impacts that may conduct to such new physiography of the vegetation. We suggest that the climate hypothesis is more likely than the human impact to explain the reduction of the Guineo-Congolian rainforest 3000 years ago.
F.R.S.-FNRS - Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique ; FRIA - Fonds pour la formation à la Recherche dans l'Industrie et dans l'Agriculture ; NERC - Natural Environment Research Council ; ANR - Agence Nationale de la Recherche
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students ; General public
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/195447

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