Reference : High spatial resolution of late-Holocene human activities in the moist forests of Cen...
Scientific congresses and symposiums : Unpublished conference/Abstract
Life sciences : Multidisciplinary, general & others
Life sciences : Environmental sciences & ecology
Arts & humanities : Multidisciplinary, general & others
Arts & humanities : History
Arts & humanities : Archaeology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/195423
High spatial resolution of late-Holocene human activities in the moist forests of Central Africa using soil charcoal and charred botanical remains
English
Morin, Julie mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > > > Form. doct. sc. agro. & ingé. biol.]
Biwolé, Achille [Université de Liège - ULiège > BIOSE > > >]
Gorel, Anaïs mailto [Université de Liège > Ingénierie des biosystèmes (Biose) > Gestion des ressources forestières et des milieux naturels >]
Dedry, Laurent [Université de Liège - ULiège > BIOSE > > >]
Gillet, Jean-François [Nature Forest Environment > > > >]
Bourland, Nils [Musée royal de l'Afrique centrale > Biologie du Bois > > >]
Fayolle, Adeline mailto [Université de Liège > Ingénierie des biosystèmes (Biose) > Gestion des ressources forestières et des milieux naturels >]
Daïnou, Kasso mailto [Université de Liège > Ingénierie des biosystèmes (Biose) > Laboratoire de Foresterie des régions trop. et subtropicales >]
Vleminckx, Jason []
Hardy, Olivier [Université Libre de Bruxelles - ULB > > > >]
Livingstone Smith, Alexandre [Musée royal de l'Afrique centrale > > > >]
Doucet, Jean-Louis mailto [Université de Liège > Ingénierie des biosystèmes (Biose) > Laboratoire de Foresterie des régions trop. et subtropicales >]
Beeckman, Hans [Musée royal de l'Afrique centrale > > > >]
27-Apr-2015
No
Yes
National
Dept. Info Lunch, Royal Museum for Central Africa
27 April 2015
Royal Museum for Central Africa
Tervuren
Belgium
[en] Africa ; Congo Basin ; Cameroon ; charcoal ; oil palm ; human disturbances ; human settlements ; slash and burn cultivation ; tropical forest
[en] Palaeoecological and archaeological studies have demonstrated that human populations have long inhabited the moist forests of central Africa. However, spatial and temporal patterns of human activities have hardly been investigated with satisfactory accuracy. In this study, we propose to characterize past human activities at local scale by using a systematic quantitative and qualitative methodology based on soil charcoal and charred botanical remains. A total of 88 equidistant test-pits were excavated along six transects in two contrasting forest types in southern Cameroon. Charred botanical remains were collected by water-sieving and sorted by type (wood charcoals, oil palm endocarps, and unidentified seeds). A total of 50 Accelerator Mass Spectrometry 14C dates were also obtained. Results showed that charred macroremains were found at multiple places in the forest, suggesting scattered human activities, which were distributed into two main periods (Phase A: 2300-1300 BP – Phase B: 580 BP to the present). Charred botanical remains indicated two types of land use: (i) domestic, with oil palm endocarps most often associated with potsherds (villages) and (ii) agricultural, with charcoal as probable remnant of slash-and-burn cultivation (fields). Oil palm endocarp abundance decreased with distance from the identified human settlements. Our methodology allowed documenting, at high resolution, the spatial and temporal patterns of human activities in central African moist forests and could be applied to other tropical contexts.
Fonds pour la formation à la Recherche dans l'Industrie et dans l'Agriculture (Communauté française de Belgique) - FRIA ; Fonds de la Recherche Fondamentale Collective - FRFC ; Fonds Roi Léopold III
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/195423

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