Reference : Projecting the self into the future in individuals with schizophrenia: a preliminary ...
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Theoretical & cognitive psychology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/190450
Projecting the self into the future in individuals with schizophrenia: a preliminary cross-sectional study.
English
Raffard, Stephane [> >]
Bortolon, Catherine [> >]
D'Argembeau, Arnaud mailto [Université de Liège > Département de Psychologie > Psychopathologie cognitive >]
Gardes, Jeanne [> >]
Gely-Nargeot, Marie-Christine [> >]
Capdevielle, Delphine [> >]
Van der Linden, Martial mailto [Université de Liège > Département de Psychologie > Psychopathologie cognitive >]
2016
Memory
Taylor & Francis Ltd
24
6
826-837
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0965-8211
1464-0686
Basingstoke
United Kingdom
[en] Mental time travel ; Optimistic bias ; Schizophrenia ; Self ; Sense of continuity
[en] The ability to project oneself into the future contributes to development and maintenance of a coherent sense of identity. If recent research has revealed that schizophrenia is associated with difficulties envisioning the future, little is known about patients' future self-representations. In this study, 27 participants with schizophrenia and 26 healthy controls were asked to simulate mental representations of plausible and highly significant future events (self-defining future projections, SDFPs) that they anticipate to happen in their personal future. Main results showed that schizophrenia patients had difficulties in reflecting on the broader meaning and implications of imagined future events. In addition, and contrary to our hypothesis, a large majority of SDFPs in schizophrenia patients were positive events, including achievements, relationship, and leisure contents. Interestingly, patients and controls did not differ on the perceived probability that these events will occur in the future. Our results suggest that schizophrenia patients have an exaggerated positive perception of their future selves. Together, these findings lend support to the idea that past and future self-defining representations have both similar and distinct characteristics in schizophrenia.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/190450
10.1080/09658211.2015.1057152

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