Reference : Ecology and evolution of plant diversity in the endangered campo rupestre: a neglecte...
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Environmental sciences & ecology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/186070
Ecology and evolution of plant diversity in the endangered campo rupestre: a neglected conservation priority
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Silveira, F. A. O. [Departamento de Botânica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil]
Negreiros, D. [Departamento de Biologia Geral, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil]
Barbosa, N. P. U. [Departamento de Biologia Geral, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil]
Buisson, E. [Université d’Avignon et desPays de Vaucluse, Institut Méditerranéen de Biodiversité et d’Ecologie – UMR CNRS IRD Aix-Marseille Université, Marseille, France]
Carmo, F. F. [Instituto Prístino, Belo Horizonte, Brazil]
Carstensen, D. W. [Departamento de Botânica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, UNESP, Araraquara, Brazil]
Conceição, A. A. [Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana, Feira de Santana, Brazil]
Cornelissen, T. G. [Departamento de Ciências Naturais, Universidade Federal de São João Del-Rei, São João del Rei, Brazil]
Echternacht, L. [Departamento de Biologia, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, Brazil]
Fernandes, G. W. [Departamento de Biologia Geral, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil, Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, United States]
Garcia, Q. S. [Departamento de Botânica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil]
Guerra, T. J. [Departamento de Botânica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil]
Jacobi, C. M. [Departamento de Biologia Geral, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil]
Lemos-Filho, J. P. [Departamento de Botânica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil]
Le Stradic, Soizig mailto [Université de Liège > Ingénierie des biosystèmes (Biose) > Biodiversité et Paysage >]
Morellato, L. P. C. [Departamento de Botânica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, UNESP, Araraquara, Brazil]
Neves, F. S. [Departamento de Biologia Geral, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil]
Oliveira, R. S. [Departamento de Biologia Vegetal, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, Brazil, School of Plant Biology, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia]
Schaefer, C. E. [Departamento de Solos, Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Viçosa, Brazil]
Viana, P. L. [Coordenação de Botânica, Museu Emílio Goeldi, Belém, Brazil]
Lambers, H. [School of Plant Biology, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia]
2015
Plant and Soil
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Yes
0032-079X
[en] Biodiversity hotspot ; Canga ; Endemism ; Functional ecology ; Nutrient-impoverished soils ; OCBIL theory ; Plant biogeography
[en] Background: Botanists, ecologists and evolutionary biologists are familiar with the astonishing species richness and endemism of the fynbos of the Cape Floristic Region and the ancient and unique flora of the kwongkan of south-western Australia. These regions represent old climatically-buffered infertile landscapes (OCBILs) that are the basis of a general hypothesis to explain their richness and endemism. However, few ecologists are familiar with the campo rupestre of central and eastern Brazil, an extremely old mountaintop ecosystem that is both a museum of ancient lineages and a cradle of continuing diversification of endemic lineages. Scope: Diversification of some lineages of campo rupestre pre-dates diversification of lowland cerrado, suggesting it may be the most ancient open vegetation in eastern South America. This vegetation comprises more than 5000 plant species, nearly 15 % of Brazil’s plant diversity, in an area corresponding to 0.78 % of its surface. Reviewing empirical data, we scrutinise five predictions of the OCBIL theory, and show that campo rupestre is fully comparable to and remarkably convergent with both fynbos and kwongkan, and fulfills the criteria for a classic OCBIL. Conclusions: The increasing threats to campo rupestre are compromising ecosystem services and we argue for the implementation of more effective conservation and restoration strategies. © 2015 Springer International Publishing Switzerland
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/186070
10.1007/s11104-015-2637-8

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