Reference : Sound production in piranhas and relatives: comparisons between species
Scientific congresses and symposiums : Poster
Life sciences : Zoology
Life sciences : Environmental sciences & ecology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/185898
Sound production in piranhas and relatives: comparisons between species
English
Melotte, Geoffrey mailto [Université de Liège > Département de Biologie, Ecologie et Evolution > Morphologie fonctionnelle et évolutive >]
Michel, Christian mailto [Université de Liège > Département de Biologie, Ecologie et Evolution > Département de Biologie, Ecologie et Evolution >]
Parmentier, Eric mailto [Université de Liège > Département de Biologie, Ecologie et Evolution > Morphologie fonctionnelle et évolutive >]
Sep-2015
Yes
International
XXV International Bioacoustics Congress
du 7 septembre 2015 au 11 septembre 2015
Murnau
Germany
[en] Acoustic communication plays an important role in the life of many teleost species where it is mainly involved in agonistic and/or courtship behavior. Despite the large number of Serrasalmidae species (92), sound production has been described only in the genera Serrasalmus and Pygocentrus. The aim of this study was first to investigate the sound producing abilities of different Serrasalmidae species and then to describe and understand the corresponding mechanisms.
One herbivorous species, Piaractus brachypomus, produces sounds composed of a single pulse. The mechanism would involve the vibration of the bladder due to the hypaxial musculature contraction. In contrast, the calls emitted by Serrasalmus rhombeus, Serrasalmus compressus, Serrasalmus marginatus, Serrasalmus elongatus, Pygocentrus nattereri and Pristobrycon eigenmanni are all harmonic sounds composed of several pulses without inter-pulse interval. They all show the same kind of mechanism: the sound results from the forced vibration of the swimbladder following the contraction of sonic muscles that are attached to a perpendicular tendon surrounding ventrally the bladder. A last species, Pygopristis denticulata, is able to produce another type of sounds. It consists of several pulses with irregular pulse period and is likely produced by a sonic muscle inserting on the skull and on the rostral part of the swimbladder.
The relatively high diversity of sound types and mechanisms in Serrasalmidae will be used in the future to understand the evolutionary development of this particular behavior. Do the mechanisms evolve separately or is there a continuity between them?
Applied and Fundamental FISH Research Center - AFFISH-RC
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/185898

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