Reference : Can we identify patients with high risk of osteoarthritis progression who will respon...
Scientific journals : Article
Human health sciences : General & internal medicine
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/185795
Can we identify patients with high risk of osteoarthritis progression who will respond to treatment? A focus on biomarkers ans frailty
English
Arden, Nigel []
Richette, Pascal []
Cooper, Cyrus []
Bruyère, Olivier mailto [Université de Liège > Département des sciences de la santé publique > Santé publique, Epidémiologie et Economie de la santé >]
Abadie, Eric []
Branco, Jaime []
Brandi, Maria-Luisa []
Berenbaum, Francis []
Clerc, Cécile []
Dennison, Elaine []
Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre []
Hochberg, Marc []
D'Hooghe, Pieter []
Herrero-Baumont, Gabriel []
Kanis, John A. []
Laslop, Andrea []
Leblanc, Véronique []
Maggi, Stefania []
Mautone, Giuseppe []
Pelletier, Jean-Pierre []
Petit-Dop, Florence []
Reiter-Niesert, Suzanne []
Rizzoli, René []
Rovati, Lucio []
Messi, Eleonora Tajana []
Tsouderos, Yannis []
Martel-Pelletier, Johanne []
Reginster, Jean-Yves mailto [Université de Liège > Département des sciences de la santé publique > Santé publique, Epidémiologie et Economie de la santé >]
2015
Drugs and Aging
Adis International
32
529-535
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
1170-229X
Auckland
New Zealand
[en] Osteoarthritis (OA), a disease affecting different
patient phenotypes, appears as an optimal candidate for
personalized healthcare. The aim of the discussions of the
European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of
Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) working group
was to explore the value of markers of different sources in
defining different phenotypes of patients with OA. The
ESCEO organized a series of meetings to explore the
possibility of identifying patients who would most benefit
from treatment for OA, on the basis of recent data and
expert opinion. In the first meeting, patient phenotypes were
identified according to the number of affected joints,
biomechanical factors, and the presence of lesions in the
subchondral bone. In the second meeting, summarized in
the present article, the working group explored other
markers involved in OA. Profiles of patients may be defined according to their level of pain, functional limitation, and
presence of coexistent chronic conditions including frailty
status. A considerable amount of data suggests that magnetic
resonance imaging may also assist in delineating
different phenotypes of patients with OA. Among multiple
biochemical biomarkers identified, none is sufficiently
validated and recognized to identify patients who should be
treated. Considerable efforts are also being made to identify
genetic and epigenetic factors involved in OA, but results
are still limited. The many potential biomarkers that could
be used as potential stratifiers are promising, but more
research is needed to characterize and qualify the existing
biomarkers and to identify new candidates.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/185795
10.1007/s40266-015-0276-7

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