Reference : Bacteria may enhance species association in an ant-aphid mutualistic relationship
Scientific journals : Article
Physical, chemical, mathematical & earth Sciences : Chemistry
Life sciences : Environmental sciences & ecology
Life sciences : Microbiology
Life sciences : Entomology & pest control
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/184536
Bacteria may enhance species association in an ant-aphid mutualistic relationship
English
Fischer, Christophe mailto [Université de Liège > Agronomie, Bio-ingénierie et Chimie (AgroBioChem) > Analyse, qual. et risques - Labo. de Chimie analytique >]
Lognay, Georges mailto [Université de Liège > Agronomie, Bio-ingénierie et Chimie (AgroBioChem) > Analyse, qual. et risques - Labo. de Chimie analytique >]
Detrain, Claire []
Heil, Martin []
Grigorescu, Alina mailto [Université de Liège > > Centre Wallon de biologie industrielle >]
Sabri, Ahmed []
Thonart, Philippe mailto [Université de Liège > Agronomie, Bio-ingénierie et Chimie (AgroBioChem) > Bio-industries >]
Haubruge, Eric mailto [Université de Liège > > Premier Vice-Recteur >]
Verheggen, François mailto [Université de Liège > Agronomie, Bio-ingénierie et Chimie (AgroBioChem) > Entomologie fonctionnelle et évolutive >]
Feb-2015
Chemoecology
Springer
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
0937-7409
1423-0445
New York
NY
[en] ant ; aphid ; mutualism ; bacteria ; VOC ; honeydew
[en] The mutualistic relationships between certain ant and aphid species are well known, the primary benefits being protection for the aphids and carbohydrate-rich honeydew for the ants. Questions remain, however, as to the exact semiochemical factors that establish and maintain such relationships. In this study we used a series of treatments and associated controls placed at the end of a two-way olfactometer to determine the degree of attractiveness of a complete plant-aphid-honeydew system as well as individual components of that system. Both the olfactometer branch selected by the black garden ant (Lasius niger), and the linear speed with which ants moved through the device, were measured. Study results showed that ants were attracted not just to the complete plant system and the honeydew itself, but also to the microbial flora in the absence of plant or honeydew, and specifically to a bacterium from the black bean aphid (Aphis fabae) honeydew, Staphylococcus xylosus. This bacterium produces a blend of semiochemicals that attract the ant scouts. This information suggests the presence of a naturally-occurring, reliable biotic cue for detection of potential aphid partners. This would have to be confirmed in natural conditions by further field experiments.
Rather than being opportunistic species that coincidentally colonize a sugar-rich environment, microorganisms living in aphid honeydew may be able to alter emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), thus significantly mediating partner attraction. A bacterial involvement in this mutualistic relationship could alter the manner in which these and similar relationships are viewed and evaluated. Future studies into mutualism stability and function among macroscopic partners will likely need to transition from a two-partner perspective to a multiple-partner perspective, and consider the microbial component, with the potential for one or more taxa making significant contributions to the relationship
Fonds pour la formation à la Recherche dans l'Industrie et dans l'Agriculture (Communauté française de Belgique) - FRIA ; Fonds de la Recherche Fondamentale Collective - FRFC
Researchers ; Students ; General public
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/184536
10.1007/s00049-015-0188-3

File(s) associated to this reference

Fulltext file(s):

FileCommentaryVersionSizeAccess
Restricted access
Fischer2015b.pdfPublisher postprint312.9 kBRequest copy

Bookmark and Share SFX Query

All documents in ORBi are protected by a user license.