Reference : Detection of response to command using voluntary control of breathing in disorders of...
Scientific journals : Article
Social & behavioral sciences, psychology : Neurosciences & behavior
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/179758
Detection of response to command using voluntary control of breathing in disorders of consciousness
English
Charland-Verville, Vanessa mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron >]
Lesenfants, Damien mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Centre de recherches du cyclotron > > >]
Sela, Lee mailto [The Weizmann Institute of Science > Department of Neurobiology > > >]
Noirhomme, Quentin mailto [> Brain Innovation B.V. > > >]
Ziegler, Erik mailto [University of Liège > Centre de recherches du cyclotron > > >]
Chatelle, Camille mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron >]
Plotkin, Anton mailto [The Weizmann Institute of Science > Department of Neurobiology > > >]
Sobel, Noam mailto [The Weizmann Institute of Science > Department of Neurobiology > > >]
Laureys, Steven mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > > Centre de recherches du cyclotron >]
23-Dec-2014
Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Frontiers Research Foundation
8
1020
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
1662-5161
Lausanne
Switzerland
[en] disorders of consciousness ; breathing ; sniffing ; vegetative state ; unresponsive wakefulness syndrome ; minimally conscious state ; diagnosis ; brain-computer interface
[en] BACKGROUND:
Detecting signs of consciousness in patients in a vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS/VS) or minimally conscious state (MCS) is known to be very challenging. Plotkin et al. (2010) recently showed the possibility of using a breathing-controlled communication device in patients with locked in syndrome. We here aim to test a breathing-based "sniff controller" that could be used as an alternative diagnostic tool to evaluate response to command in severely brain damaged patients with chronic disorders of consciousness (DOC).
METHODS:
Twenty-five DOC patients were included. Patients' resting breathing-amplitude was measured during a 5 min resting condition. Next, they were instructed to end the presentation of a music sequence by sniffing vigorously. An automated detection of changes in breathing amplitude (i.e., >1.5 SD of resting) ended the music and hence provided positive feedback to the patient.
RESULTS:
None of the 11 UWS/VS patients showed a sniff-based response to command. One out of 14 patients with MCS was able to willfully modulate his breathing pattern to answer the command on 16/19 trials (accuracy 84%). Interestingly, this patient failed to show any other motor response to command.
DISCUSSION:
We here illustrate the possible interest of using breathing-dependent response to command in the detection of residual cognition in patients with DOC after severe brain injury.
Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique (Communauté française de Belgique) - F.R.S.-FNRS ; Commission européenne : Direction générale de la Recherche ; James McDonnell Foundation ; Mind Science Foundation ; French Speaking Community Concerted Research Action
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/179758
10.3389/fnhum.2014.01020

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