Reference : Selenium in the environment, metabolism and involvement in body functions
Scientific journals : Article
Life sciences : Animal production & animal husbandry
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/179661
Selenium in the environment, metabolism and involvement in body functions
English
Mehdi, Youcef mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > > > Doct. sc. vété. (Bologne)]
Hornick, Jean-Luc mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de productions animales > Nutrition animale en milieu tropical >]
Istasse, Louis mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de productions animales > Nutrition des animaux domestiques >]
Dufrasne, Isabelle mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département de productions animales > Nutrition des animaux domestiques >]
2013
Molecules
MDPI
18
3
3292-3311
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
1420-3049
Basel
Switzerland
[en] Antioxidant ; Deficiency ; Environment ; Reproduction ; Selenium ; Selenium metabolism ; Selenoprotein
[en] Selenium (Se34 79) is a metalloid which is close to sulfur (S) in terms of properties. The Se concentration in soil varies with type, texture and organic matter content of the soil and with rainfall. Its assimilation by plants is influenced by the physico-chemical properties of the soil (redox status, pH and microbial activity). The presence of Se in the atmosphere is linked to natural and anthropogenic activities. Selenoproteins, in which selenium is present as selenocysteine, present an important role in many body functions, such as antioxidant defense and the formation of thyroid hormones. Some selenoprotein metabolites play a role in cancer prevention. In the immune system, selenium stimulates antibody formation and activity of helper T cells, cytotoxic T cells and Natural Killer (NK) cells. The mechanisms of intestinal absorption of selenium differ depending on the chemical form of the element. Selenium is mainly absorbed in the duodenum and caecum by active transport through a sodium pump. The recommended daily intake of selenium varies from 60 μg/day for women, to 70 μg/day for men. In growing ruminants the requirements are estimated at 100 μg/kg dry matter and 200 μg/Kg for pregnant or lactating females. A deficiency can cause reproductive disorders in humans and animals.
[en] Selenium (Se34 79) is a metalloid which is close to sulfur (S) in terms of properties. The Se concentration in soil varies with type, texture and organic matter content of the soil and with rainfall. Its assimilation by plants is influenced by the physico-chemical properties of the soil (redox status, pH and microbial activity). The presence of Se in the atmosphere is linked to natural and anthropogenic activities. Selenoproteins, in which selenium is present as selenocysteine, present an important role in many body functions, such as antioxidant defense and the formation of thyroid hormones. Some selenoprotein metabolites play a role in cancer prevention. In the immune system, selenium stimulates antibody formation and activity of helper T cells, cytotoxic T cells and Natural Killer (NK) cells. The mechanisms of intestinal absorption of selenium differ depending on the chemical form of the element. Selenium is mainly absorbed in the duodenum and caecum by active transport through a sodium pump. The recommended daily intake of selenium varies from 60 μg/day for women, to 70 μg/day for men. In growing ruminants the requirements are estimated at 100 μg/kg dry matter and 200 μg/Kg for pregnant or lactating females. A deficiency can cause reproductive disorders in humans and animals.
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/179661
also: http://hdl.handle.net/2268/179662
10.3390/molecules18033292

File(s) associated to this reference

Fulltext file(s):

FileCommentaryVersionSizeAccess
Open access
molecules-18-03292.pdfPublisher postprint229.04 kBView/Open

Bookmark and Share SFX Query

All documents in ORBi are protected by a user license.