Reference : Contrasting biogeochemical characteristics of the Oubangui River and tributaries (Con...
Scientific journals : Article
Physical, chemical, mathematical & earth Sciences : Earth sciences & physical geography
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/170116
Contrasting biogeochemical characteristics of the Oubangui River and tributaries (Congo River basin)
English
Bouillon, Steven []
Yambélé, Athanase []
Gillikin, David P. []
Teodoru, Cristian []
Darchambeau, François mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département d'astrophys., géophysique et océanographie (AGO) > Océanographie chimique >]
Lambert, Thibault []
Borges, Alberto mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Département d'astrophys., géophysique et océanographie (AGO) > Océanographie chimique >]
2014
Scientific Reports
Nature Publishing Group
4
5402
Yes (verified by ORBi)
International
2045-2322
London
United Kingdom
[en] The Oubangui is a major tributary of the Congo River. We describe the biogeochemistry of contrasting tributaries within its central catchment, with watershed vegetation ranging from wooded savannahs to humid rainforest. Compared to a 2-year monitoring record on the mainstem Oubangui, these tributaries show a wide range of biogeochemical signatures, from highly diluted blackwaters (low turbidity, pH, conductivity, and total alkalinity) in rainforests to those more typical for savannah systems. Spectral analyses of chromophoric dissolved organic matter showed wide temporal variations in the Oubangui compared to spatio-temporal variations in the tributaries, and confirm that different pools of dissolved organic carbon are mobilized during different hydrological stages. d13C of dissolved inorganic carbon ranged between -28.1 per mil and -25.8 per mil, and was strongly correlated to both partial pressure of CO2 and to the estimated contribution of carbonate weathering to total alkalinity, suggesting an important control of the weathering regime on CO2 fluxes. All tributaries were oversaturated in dissolved greenhouse gases (CH4, N2O, CO2), with highest levels in rivers draining rainforest. The high diversity observed underscores the importance of sampling that covers the variability in subcatchment characteristics, to improve our understanding of biogeochemical cycling in the Congo Basin.
European Research Council
AFRIVAL: ‘‘African river basins: catchment-scale carbon fluxes and transformations’’
Researchers
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/170116
10.1038/srep05402
FP7 ; 240002 - AFRIVAL - African river basins: catchment-scale carbon fluxes and transformations.

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