Reference : The end of roaming in the forest causes a loss of timber resources: the paradox of sl...
Scientific congresses and symposiums : Unpublished conference/Abstract
Arts & humanities : History
Arts & humanities : Multidisciplinary, general & others
Life sciences : Environmental sciences & ecology
Arts & humanities : Archaeology
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/164922
The end of roaming in the forest causes a loss of timber resources: the paradox of slash-and-burn agriculture
English
Morin-Rivat, Julie mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Forêts, Nature et Paysage > Laboratoire de Foresterie des régions trop. et subtropicales >]
Fayolle, Adeline mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Forêts, Nature et Paysage > Gestion des ressources forestières et des milieux naturels >]
Favier, Charly [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - CNRS > > > >]
Bremond, Laurent [EPHE > > > >]
Gourlet-Fleury, Sylvie [CIRAD > > > >]
Lejeune, Philippe mailto [Université de Liège - ULiège > Forêts, Nature et Paysage > Gestion des ressources forestières et des milieux naturels >]
Beeckman, Hans [Musée royal de l'Afrique centrale > > > >]
Doucet, Jean-Louis [Université de Liège - ULiège > Forêts, Nature et Paysage > Laboratoire de Foresterie des régions trop. et subtropicales >]
27-Feb-2014
No
No
International
Tropical ecosystems: between protection and production
du 25 au 28 février 2014
GTÖ
Freising-Munich
Allemagne
[en] recent history ; colonial period ; Central Africa ; human disturbances ; tropical trees ; forest regeneration ; tree population structures ; ligh-demanding species ; age of the trees
[en] Tropical forests are not believed as pristine anymore. Their structure and specific composition are induced by past climatic and human disturbances over years. In the African moist forests, the emergent trees are mainly light-demanding. These trees are considered to derive from the recent disturbances of the last centuries. Most of them are exploited for their timber. However, several of these tree species are currently suffering from a lack of regeneration that threatens the specific diversity of the forests and the sustainability of timber exploitation. Through dendrometric and radiocarbon analyses we found that the majority of the trees of the Congo Basin are not older than 160 years. This corresponds to about the year 1850 when the Europeans colonized the inner regions of Central Africa. By reassembling people along the road axes, the colonial administration reduced the forest roaming. Former activities such as slash and burn agriculture created large openings in the canopy that allowed light-demanding tree species to establish. Currently we observed that timber logging does not provide openings large enough for the recruitment of these species. We thus anticipate that adjustments in forest management strategies shall be made to preserve the forest resources, for instance by recreating the conditions of slash and burn agriculture.
CoForChange (EraNet - Biodiversa) ; Fonds de la Recherche Fondamentale Collective - FRFC ; Fonds pour la formation à la Recherche dans l'Industrie et dans l'Agriculture (Communauté française de Belgique) - FRIA
Researchers ; Professionals ; Students ; General public
http://hdl.handle.net/2268/164922

File(s) associated to this reference

Fulltext file(s):

FileCommentaryVersionSizeAccess
Restricted access
20140227_GTO_2014_Morin-Rivat.pdfAuthor postprint4.4 MBRequest copy

Bookmark and Share SFX Query

All documents in ORBi are protected by a user license.